The Grandview Heights Planning Commission heard a report from planning intern Adam Hill-Warren at its March 22 meeting on the results of a survey regarding the city's sign code

The Grandview Heights Planning Commission heard a report from planning intern Adam Hill-Warren at its March 22 meeting on the results of a survey regarding the city's sign code

Hill-Warren sent planning commission and city council members photographs of more than 30 signs of various types and locations, about half located outside Grandview, and asked them to comment on each sign using a variety of criteria.

The survey and the discussion at the March 21 meeting "is just the beginning" of a process, said Patrik Bowman, director of administration/economic development.

The first goal is to determine whether the sign code needs to be rewritten, Bowman said.

"Second, even if we keep (the sign code) the same, we want to start developing purpose statements" for the regulations, he said.

Hill-Warren reviewed some of the common responses he received in the survey.

There seems to be a consensus that when it comes to signs, "people like variety over uniformity," Hill-Warren said.

Different signs may be appropriate, he said, depending on the type of building and the section of town.

Everyone also seemed to agree that "historic" signs should be maintained in the city, Hill-Warren said. For example, although the space is now a store, the old sign that served as a movie marquee for the State Theater in Westerville has been maintained, he said.

Simple signs in which little more lettering than the business name would be allowed are preferred, Hill-Warren said.

Another common view is that the signs on multi-tenant buildings should have the same color scheme "so it all blends together," he said.

"People disagreed on awning signs," Hill-Warren said. "Some like them, some don't."

There were also a lot of different opinions on what respondents want to see regarding sign setback regulations, Hill-Warren said.

Some regulations in the sign code have been ignored in the city, he said, and the city's sign code is "much less specific than other communities.

"I'm just amazed more signs don't require planning commission approval, so there's no consistency on some buildings," planning commission president Dorothy Pritchard said.

The question is what criteria should be used to determine when the planning commission would review signs, Bowman said.

"You can have guidelines for when. It's always subjective," Pritchard said. "It can be done, although I don't envy anyone writing it."

Bowman said the input received in the survey can be used to develop potential standards and principles that could be added to the sign code.

"Let's test some things," he said.