The city of Grandview Heights will hold its first electronic waste recycling day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 6 at the service department office, 1525 Goodale Blvd.

The city of Grandview Heights will hold its first electronic waste recycling day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 6 at the service department office, 1525 Goodale Blvd.

The event will give people the opportunity to safely dispose of electronic and computer equipment at no cost for most items.

The recycling effort is sponsored by the city and Possitivity, a Dublin-based company that includes e-waste recycling among the services it provides.

The following items may be dropped off at the recycling day event at no cost:

* Cables, power cords and AC adapters.

* Calculators and typewriters.

* Cellphones and telephones.

* Computers.

* Fax machines.

* Keyboards and mice.

* Laptop computers and laptop docks.

* LCD (flat-panel) monitors.

* PDAs.

* Printers and plotters.

* Routers and switches.

* Scanners.

* Uninterrupted power systems.

CRT monitors and televisions may be dropped off for a $10 fee for each item, said Pam Rybak, Grandview Service Department secretary.

"The fee is charged because of the hazardous material handling," she said.

Possitivity employees "will collect items right from your car," Rybak said.

Motorists are asked to enter the service department parking lot from Goodale Boulevard onto Glendale Avenue, she said. After their items are collected, they can exit the lot on Glendale to Douglas Street and on to Grandview Avenue, Rybak said.

Appliances such as refrigerators and freezers will not be accepted, she said.

Possitivity will data-wipe or physically destroy all hard drives that may contain sensitive information at no charge, Rybak said.

The items collected during the event will be recycled safely and securely by Possitivity, Sanitation Supervisor Mike Shankle said.

"This program will allow you to dispose of your electronic items and allow us to keep them out of the landfill," he said. "It's a win-win situation."

The city collects most electronic items that residents leave out with their refuse and sends all of the equipment to a landfill, Shankle said.

"We're charged based on the tonnage of the waste we send to the landfill," he said.

Removing electronic items from the refuse it sends to the landfill will save the city money, Shankle said.

It is likely that the city will stop accepting e-waste items sometime in 2013, he said.

"We'd like to hold this e-recycling day twice a year to make it convenient for people to dispose of their items," Shankle said.