A group of Ohio State University senior city and regional planning students Dec. 16 presented Marble Cliff Village Council with its final report and set of recommendations from its studio project regarding the village.

A group of Ohio State University senior city and regional planning students Dec. 16 presented Marble Cliff Village Council with its final report and set of recommendations from its studio project regarding the village.

The process included researching the demographics of the village, examining census data and the history of the community as well as its physical characteristics, and talking to residents, business owners and Village Council members.

The most important goals identified were to improve the village's identity, strengthen the business community, enhance the aesthetics of the business district, and improve circulation for and lessen conflicts among motorists, cyclists, pedestrians and public transit.

"We found that along the Fifth Avenue business district, a lot of those buildings are old," OSU student Evan Mulcahy said.

One objective could be to create a "Main Street district" between Cambridge Boulevard and the railroad tracks, he said.

A community commons could be created at the corner of Dublin Road and Fifth Avenue.

A complete street design also would help the district's aesthetics, Mulcahy said.

New buildings could be constructed along Fifth Avenue, he said.

"The Main Street style would lead to increased vibrancy," Mulcahy said, and the opportunity to attract higher-income tenants could increase the village's revenues.

An identifiable logo and signs would provide visual consistency and low-cost identity, Brad Fisher said.

The students' report recommends three objectives -- improve walkability, slow down traffic and improve safety for bicyclists -- to improve circulation on Cambridge Boulevard, Arlington Avenue and Fifth Avenue.

Traffic could be slowed by using traffic-calming techniques such as chicanes, raised pedestrian crosswalks and narrowing lanes.

Buffer zones added along Fifth Avenue would separate pedestrians from traffic and improve the walkability of the village.

Mayor Kent Studebaker said the students' report was impressive in its depth and will be a document village officials can refer to in the years to come.