If reports about Beulah Park moving are true, Grove City could lose $30,000 in tax revenue and local businesses could lose money as well, city officials said.

If reports about Beulah Park moving are true, Grove City could lose $30,000 in tax revenue and local businesses could lose money as well, city officials said.

Chuck Boso, Grove City development director, said the city collects about $30,000 in direct taxes from the racetrack, one of only three thoroughbred tracks in Ohio.

Mahoning Valley Development Group has said it hopes to spend $300-million to develop a horse-racing track and resort complex on 100 acres in the Youngstown area.

A press release from Mahoning Valley cited "pretty credible" rumors indicating Penn National Gaming Inc., which purchased Beulah Park last year, might move Toledo's Raceway Park or Beulah Park.

Mahoning Valley is led by two Cleveland-area entrepreneurs, Rick Lertzman and Bradford Pressman. The press release quoted Pressman.

Penn National would not comment on the report. The company owns both tracks and also is developing casinos in Columbus and Toledo.

Boso said while the tax revenue generated by Beulah Park isn't a substantial amount of the city's tax base, losing the track would be hard in other ways.

"The biggest impact would be on the families and workers that work there and on the area in terms of business," Boso said.

"Even farmers that have hay or straw (would feel it, as would) other ancillary businesses. ... Some of the people that go there shop at (Grove City) restaurants and buy gas, that kind of thing."

The track has been part of the Grove City community since 1923, when it was the first thoroughbred track in Ohio.

"Beulah Park has always been a good neighbor to us," Boso said. "We've used it for functions like the Fourth of July and Balloonfest."

On the other hand, Boso said the 211 acres on which the track sits might have a bright future if Beulah Park moves.

"The majority of the property is underutilized because it's only used part of the year," he said.

"If they leave us, it certainly will affect people's lives ... but there's also a lot of opportunities for the city to develop those 211 acres."

William Diehl, executive director of the Grove City Chamber of Commerce, said he's unsure how a Beulah Park move would affect the city.

"I think it would hurt us, but I would have to look at all the ramifications of them moving and what could possibly go back into that area," Diehl said.

The park started its winter-spring season Jan. 8, its second since Penn National purchased the track in June 2009.