A lifetime of memories for Raymond Ruoff, 92, are now chronicled in a new scrapbook prepared for him by Grove City resident Terri Harbage, with supplies from the local shop Red Letter Journals.

A lifetime of memories for Raymond Ruoff, 92, are now chronicled in a new scrapbook prepared for him by Grove City resident Terri Harbage, with supplies from the local shop Red Letter Journals.

Ruoff is a retired police captain who spent 24 years on the Grove City police force. He had kept a scrapbook of photos, certificates of commendation and newspaper clippings. It was showing its age and its contents were out of order after he lent it to others.

In February, he visited Red Letter Journals for help.

"He'd come into the store looking for me," said Karen Dover, who owned the business until January of this year, when she sold it to one of her employees, Tanya Moore.

Moore tried to figure out how she could help him.

"It was in a shambles," Moore said of Ruoff's scrapbook. "There were newspaper clippings that he had just taped down."

Moore called Harbage, a regular store customer, who volunteered to help reassemble the book.

"Terri came down to the store and sat with Ray for two days straight and organized all his pictures," Moore said. "Some of the stories were unbelievable."

Ruoff started as a patrolman and advanced through the ranks of the department. His scrapbook was filled with certificates of commendation and newspaper clippings.

"I don't mean to brag, but I put nine people back ... in the penitentiary. I saved three people's lives. I've got quite a record here," Ruoff said.

Harbage said she was happy to help Ruoff.

"I do (scrapbooking) for relaxation and socialization, so I'm at Red Letter Journals quite a bit," said Harbage, who has not been able to work since 2008 due to a head injury. "I offered to put it together for him because I love to scrapbook and I love to help people."

Harbage and Ruoff's son, Eddie Ruoff, agreed she would donate her time and he would pay for the materials.

During the next few weeks, Harbage used a three-ring binder and archival-quality materials to create a new book that would stand the test of time. She used a special tool to remove the glued and taped-in elements from the original pages of the old book and sprayed the newspaper articles with a preservative to keep them from fading.

Eddie Ruoff also found a photograph of Ruoff and his wife, who died three years ago, for Harbage to include at the end of the scrapbook.

"We kind of kept it hidden in case he stopped in to see the progress and didn't give it to him until it was all done," Harbage said.

When the book was finished, a friend brought Ruoff to the Grove City Welcome Center and museum, where Dover, Moore and Harbage were waiting to present him with the finished product on March 16.

"I was in shock," Ruoff said. "When I went down there with my old scrapbook, I never dreamed anything like this was coming up."

Retiring police chief Joseph Wise also attended the presentation.

"The moment was just so emotional and so spectacular," Moore said.

Harbage was impressed by the history in Ruoff's scrapbook.

"He's an amazing man," Harbage said. "I just found it real interesting. It was a real pleasure to be able to do this for the man."