Grove City has declined to join an agreement with Columbus and seven central Ohio suburbs to share maintenance of their fleets of vehicles.

Grove City has declined to join an agreement with Columbus and seven central Ohio suburbs to share maintenance of their fleets of vehicles.

"Right now we don't think it would serve our interests to be directly involved," said city administrator Phil Honsey. "We will continue to keep an ear to the ground regarding potential value in cooperative ventures in shared services with other jurisdictions."

Grove City has had conceptual conversations about sharing services with South-Western City Schools, Honsey said. The city currently purchases its health and liability insurances with two separate consortiums. The city also is in a cooperative purchasing program with the state and the Ohio Department of Transportation for trucks.

The communities that are involved in the fleet-maintenance subcommittee are Columbus, Gahanna, Dublin, Grandview Heights, Hilliard, Upper Arlington, Worthington, New Albany and Westerville.

Municipalities have been examining ways to share services as part of their recent pledge to form an incentive agreement to stop what has been called "job poaching."

Grove City and nine other municipalities have pledged to form an agreement that would stipulate how they offer financial incentives to prospective businesses.

On Dec. 14, Grove City and the other nine cities signed a letter of intent regarding that agreement.

Specifics of the agreement are expected to be finalized by March.

City councils, which would have to approve the agreement, would review the details in May.

If a city used tax incentives to attract a company with an annual payroll of at least $10,000, the city losing that company would receive half of the company's income tax revenue for five years. The agreement also would explore how to set up a regional framework to attract national and international clients.

"The same group of community leaders are addressing both economic development and shared services. They are not inseparably linked, but they are both viewed by leaders as important. However, there are subgroups of different city staff assigned to economic development versus shared services," Honsey said. Grove City is participating in the economic development subgroup.

Economically, municipalities do not exist as separate communities. Working together to create jobs is "the over-arching issue," he said.