Funding earned from a positive state report card performance will help the South-Western City School District implement wireless technology in more of its buildings.

Funding earned from a positive state report card performance will help the South-Western City School District implement wireless technology in more of its buildings.

The district will use $377,896 in state funds it received by earning an "Excellent with Distinction" rating on its state report card toward wireless technology.

The Ohio Department of Education's subsidy for high-performing school districts is awarded to districts identified as "Excellent with Distinction" or "Excellent" in the fiscal year 2011 Report Card. Qualifying districts receive $17 per student.

The district plans to have all high schools and middle schools using wireless technology by the start of the next school year, said executive director of management information services Bryan Mulvany. Currently, six of 31 district schools use wireless technology.

The District Service Center and the South-Western Career Academy became wireless a couple of years ago, Mulvany said.

The district's transportation complex and Grove City High School also are wireless. By qualifying for federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds, Franklin Heights and Westland high schools and Finland and Pleasant View middle schools also became wireless.

Mulvany estimated the cost to make a district building wireless is $20,000 to $40,000. The district hasn't yet developed a building schedule or estimated specific building costs. Central Crossing High School is the district's first priority, followed by the three remaining middle schools.

AARA funds originally dictated how the district implemented wireless technology across its buildings, Mulvany said. The district will wait to see if Issue 8 passes before addressing its elementaries. If Issue 8 passes, all but two elementary buildings would become wireless.

"We can see it easily happening if Issue 8 is successful," Mulvany said.

Issue 8, a 38-year, $148-million bond issue, at 2.9 mills, is designed to raise money to qualify the district for participation in an Ohio School Facilities Commission project.

If the issue passes in the March 6 election, SWCS would replace Franklin Heights High School, build 13 new elementary schools and make minor renovations to Buckeye Woods and Darby Woods elementary schools.

Several years ago, the district installed wireless controllers at the District Service Center, Mulvany said.

The district currently has a three-year contract in place for wireless maintenance and support. After that contract expires, the district will begin paying an annual maintenance and support fee beginning in fiscal year 2014.

Mulvany didn't have a cost estimate for the fee. As more wireless access points are installed across the district, that annual cost will increase. The fee is a general fund expenditure.