If voters approve Issue 8 on March 6, city officials say the resulting construction would bring in additional income tax dollars for Grove City.

If voters approve Issue 8 on March 6, city officials say the resulting construction would bring in additional income tax dollars for Grove City.

City finance director Mike Turner estimated the city could receive about $480,000 in income taxes from the construction of four elementary buildings in Grove City.

"Every income tax dollar helps. They all add up," he said.

Issue 8, a 38-year, $148-million bond issue, at 2.9 mills for South-Western City Schools, would satisfy a 50-percent contribution required by the Ohio School Facilities Commission for its facilities assistance program, which would allow SWCS to replace a number of aging buildings.

If passed, the issue would be a "no-new millage" issue that won't raise the bond millage rate above 2012 collection levels, district treasurer Hugh Garside said.

The project would include building 13 new elementary schools, replacing Franklin Heights High School and making minor renovations to Buckeye Woods and Darby Woods elementary schools. The changes would affect about 8,000 students.

"Finland Elementary and East Franklin Elementary will be combined into one elementary school as neither has the minimum enrollment of 350 students required by the OSFC," said executive director of communications and community relations Sandy Nekoloff.

Highland, Monterey, Richard Avenue and J.C. Sommer elementaries are the Grove City schools slated to be replaced. Darbydale Elementary has a Grove City mailing address, but actually is outside the city.

If each elementary school cost about $12 million to construct, total construction for buildings in Grove City would cost about $48 million, Turner estimated.

"This is all just assumptions," he said.

If the total construction cost was divided equally between labor and materials, that would mean $24 million in wages, Turner said. The city would receive 2 percent of that number in income taxes, or $480,000.

Turner said Grove City hasn't seen a lot of major construction projects in the last couple of years.