A local craft supplies store is offering special classes for individuals with developmental disabilities.

A local craft supplies store is offering special classes for individuals with developmental disabilities.

Red Letter Journals, 3937 Broadway, is running a 13-week scrapbooking class for the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities' Community Connections program.

"It's so therapeutic for the individuals," owner Tonya Moore said.

The scrapbooking class is just one of the activities available to those with disabilities.

Community Connections, a program run through the local nonprofit Association for the Developmentally Disabled, works with ARC Industries Inc., which employs developmentally disabled people.

Community Connections takes ARC's employees to two different activities each day around the Columbus area, said Community Connections recreation specialist Emily Held.

In addition to scrapbooking, individuals can participate in book clubs, boxing, volunteering, yoga, table games and YMCA fitness programs.

Community Connections uses county funds to cover all or most activity fees. Individuals are charged no more than $5 for classes. The goal is to help them mingle with others.

"It's really rewarding to take them out into the community," Held said.

Moore said her foster son, who is developmentally disabled, inspired her to work with Community Connections.

"It's just so fulfilling," she said.

Moore said she thinks many of the scrapbooking students otherwise don't have the opportunity to do some of the crafts they do at her store.

"They don't have the products; they don't have the instructor or the ability to get to the store," she said.

The scrapbooking class began in January. In April, some of the students will begin a card-making class.

The students stay for one hour for the weekly scrapbooking class, led by a volunteer instructor experienced with developmental disabilities.

The students range from 20 to 70 years old. Each week, the scrapbooking class revolves around a different theme, such as a favorite food or pets. The students bring in their own photos to use.

"Their skills have grown so much," Moore said.