Two films created by Franklin Heights High School students will be shown in the Arnold Sports Film Festival on March 2.

Two films created by Franklin Heights High School students will be shown in the Arnold Sports Film Festival on March 2.

"More Than a Sport," produced and directed by Brad Kakos and Phanharith Dang, and "Not Your Typical Athlete," produced and directed by Julia Ott and Marianna Stephens, will be among the films to be judged in the festival's high school category.

Screenings will be from noon to 2 p.m., 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. March 2 at the Arena Grand Movie Theatre, 175 W. Nationwide Blvd.

Thirty-five films were accepted in the high school category, said festival director and chair Jim Hern. An awards ceremony will be held from 1-4 p.m. March 4. First- through third-place winners will receive a medal. First-place high school contestants will win an "Arnie," a trophy replica of Arnold Schwarzenegger, who will present the awards. The first place winner also will receive a film production software package. The winner of the overall event gets to spend a day with Schwarzenegger in California.

This is the second time the festival will be held. Last year, Franklin Heights High School earned second place, while Grove City High School took first place.

The contest's challenge was to tell an athlete's story, Franklin Heights broadcast news teacher Sheila Fagn said.

The students "each tried to find a unique approach to it," Fagn said.

The contest was announced in September, and students worked on ideas and production in addition to their class work for months, Fagn said.

Students used iMovie to produce the 3- to 5-minute films.

"More than a Sport" illustrates the challenges wrestlers face working on conditioning and adhering to a strict diet. Wrestling footage was acquired over the entire season, Fagn said. Kakos, a member of the Franklin Heights wrestling team, served as both producer and film subject. "Not your Typical Athlete" explores and breaks stereotypes associated with the image of an athlete.

The pieces the students created for the festival are a bit longer and more polished than what the broadcast news classroom production entails, Franklin Heights teacher Tom Mann said.

"They spend quite a bit of time putting one of those together," he said.