A proposed amendment to Ohio House Bill 386 would give Grove City up to $3 million to develop Beulah Park after Penn National moves its racing facility from Grove City to Dayton.

A proposed amendment to Ohio House Bill 386 would give Grove City up to $3 million to develop Beulah Park after Penn National moves its racing facility from Grove City to Dayton.

The amendment, proposed by state Rep. Cheryl Grossman (R-Grove City) would set aside $12 million in proceeds from gambling sites that were relocated to the Racetrack Facility Community Economic Redevelopment Fund for fiscal year 2012. The funds will be allocated to three former race track locations, including Grove City. No more than $3 million would go to each community.

The amendment was approved in the Ohio House of Representatives and now moves to the Senate.

Grossman said she had Grove City in mind when drafting the amendment. Located in the heart of the city, Beulah Park is an important piece of property.

"I wanted to make sure that we had the infrastructure funded as we look at the next use of that property," Grossman said.

The funds would be used for repurposing or demolishing abandoned horse-racing facilities or area reinvestment. Possible projects could include site planning, site certification, structure demolition, physical site redevelopment, utility relocation, or construction. Projects cannot include acquisition or related expenses. The city's development director would be in charge of implementing the funds.

Grossman said the funding structure is yet to be defined.

The money will help change the former Beulah Park site to a new type of business once Penn National leaves, city council member Jeff Davis said.

"Cheryl had the foresight to think about our particular situation in Grove City," he said. "I think (the Town Center development and Beulah Park) will almost go hand in hand if we do this right."

The Ohio Historical Society last year recognized Beulah Park, 3811 Southwest Blvd., as a historic site.

Created first as a park shortly after the Beulah subdivision was built in 1889, Beulah Park in 1923 became Ohio's first thoroughbred race track, said local historian Janet Shailer.