The Pizzuti Companies' plans for Grove City's Town Center include creating about 150-200 multi-family apartment units in the downtown area.

The Pizzuti Companies' plans for Grove City's Town Center include creating about 150-200 multi-family apartment units in the downtown area.

The company expects to submit a development plan to the city by fall, vice president of the Columbus region Shannon Hamons said during a May 21 presentation in council chambers. A preliminary site layout for units would be ready by mid to late October.

An updated market study showed significant support for non-owner occupied residential units in and around the Town Center area, Hamons said.

Pizzuti's research also includes identifying future space needs of the city's library, city hall and public safety department. Hamons said he has addressed the reuse of the current city hall building with prospective individuals.

"Those are some things that we're doing," Hamons said.

Grove City and Pizzuti signed a development agreement, which allows Pizzuti to present and implement comprehensive redevelopment for properties throughout the town center. The city has committed up to $30,000 to engage architectural, engineering and other professional firms to work with Pizzuti.

"It's going to take more than one project" to create change in the Town Center, Hamons said.

Pizzuti was to analyze 16 areas the city had highlighted in the town center as possible redevelopment sites. Development could be commercial or residential and a combination of public and private development.

Pizzuti has since identified six or seven sites suitable for residential and commercial redevelopment, and is in negotiation with private property owners.

Potential developments could encompass more than one parcel, Hamons told The Record. Negotiations still are in progress. Although the focus is on private development, the city could participate in a public-private partnership.

While the old lumberyard site behind City Hall was one of the parcels included in the initial study, Pizzuti has since moved away from that option, Hamons said, citing the property's configuration and proximity to railroad tracks. The area can have other, more appropriate uses, he said, adding that two property owners expressed interest in the site.

The agreement between the city and Pizzuti expired Feb. 28. However, the contract contained language that allowed for the extension of the contract for up to 12 months, city administrator Chuck Boso said. After that point, another contract would have to be negotiated. The city has not yet received any sort of invoice from Pizzuti.