Thanks in part to a mild winter, Penn National Gaming's Hollywood Casino Columbus on the West Side is coming along on schedule, a spokesperson with the company said.

Thanks in part to a mild winter, Penn National Gaming's Hollywood Casino Columbus on the West Side is coming along on schedule, a spokesperson with the company said.

The property is set to open in the fall. Final touches will continue up to the opening date. Construction teams are building out the casino's interior. Much of the progress on the exterior and landscaping is readily visible.

The construction and development costs of about $400 million include the $50-million license fee.

The development employs approximately 3,500 construction workers. By the fall, Penn National will hire about 2,000 permanent team members. To date, the company has hired or extended job offers to about 550 people, leaving more than 1,400 positions to fill in the areas of table games, food and beverages and other stations.

Ohio's four new casinos are expected to bring in $1.42 billion once they are fully operational, according to estimates from the Ohio Department of Taxation, and they could generate $470 million in tax revenue for the state.

Grove City Mayor Richard "Ike" Stage said the city "really can't quantify an impact" at this time, though.

"We are hoping for a positive impact on our food service, hotel, retail businesses, and eventually, we expect to have several casino employees become Grove City homeowners," Stage said.

The South-Western City School District is slated to receive property-tax revenues associated with the casino's building and land value, excluding its contents, district Treasurer Hugh Garside Jr. said. The district won't see any property-tax revenue until the second half of fiscal year 2013-14, though.

"I don't feel that it is appropriate to guess the value the county auditor will place on the casino," Garside said, adding that he intends to monitor the process closely.

Thirty-three percent of funds from the casino's taxes and license fees are required to go to schools and will be collected at the state level and then redistributed, Garside said. He referenced a story in The Columbus Dispatch that cited the district's portion to be roughly $800,000 in FY13 and $2,000,000 in FY14 and FY15.

"I was quoted in that article saying that I believe this new funding source will be used to supplant, not supplement, the school district funding," Garside said. "Due to my belief, I did not include this revenue within the five-year forecast approved at the May Board of Education meeting. I hope I am wrong in my assumption because the additional dollars would be welcomed."

ThisWeek reporter Jennifer Noblit contributed to this story.