It's safe to say Ben Mosko, his wife Karen and father-in-law Austin Fairhurst really took root in their new home.

It's safe to say Ben Mosko, his wife Karen and father-in-law Austin Fairhurst really took root in their new home.

The Moskos moved from New Concord into their Grove City home on Mound View Lane in April, and in May, they planted tomatoes in the garden.

Today, three of the four original tomato plants have grown to be more than 12 feet in height.

"We had no idea they were going to do that," Ben Mosko said. "They just kept on growing. ... It's like a miracle almost."

Karen Mosko said the plants just grew every week, never stopping.

"Every time I look at the plants, I have to laugh," she said. "There's just something about them."

The plants have grown so high, Ben Mosko said they have to use wooden stakes and wire to keep the plants from falling over and to hold them steady against high winds.

"It's been a concern," he said. "I really don't want them to get taller."

The tomatoes in the Mosko garden are primarily the Big Boy variety, which typically grow to about five or six feet in height.

"What you look for is a tomato nice for eating or canning," Ben Mosko said. "A fresh tomato is very different from the kind you get at the store. ... Egg and tomato sandwiches -- you can't beat that."

Karen Mosko said the family also enjoys fried green tomatoes and has been using the produce in all sorts of dishes.

"You never get sick of tomatoes," Fairhurst said. "We've been eating them all summer."

Ben Mosko said the size of their tomato plants has had neighbors speculating what got them so tall. Some have guessed it was the proximity of the garden to the air conditioning unit in the backyard, blasting cool air in the summer heat, but Mosko said he doubts that.

"We just hit on the right combination," he said.

Ben Mosko said his father and six brothers always had a garden growing up, and that in New Concord, he and Karen always has something growing in the garden.

He added they are looking to expand the garden next year. They already have some peppers growing and in the summer grew onions.

"It was just a lot of fun," he said.

Fairhurst has also been working in a garden his whole life.

"It's in your blood," Fairhurst said. "If you like to garden, it ain't work."