Grove City police say a kitchen explosion led to the arrest of a drug manufacturer who learned his trade from the Internet.

Grove City police say a kitchen explosion led to the arrest of a drug manufacturer who learned his trade from the Internet.

At approximately 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17, the Grove City Division of Police and the Jackson Township Fire Division responded to a report of an explosion at 2724 Walden Bluff Ct. There, officers arrested and charged resident William D. Lawrence, 30, with two felony counts of illegal manufacture of drugs and two felony counts of drug possession.

According to a news release from the police division, Lawrence told officers he had been using butane gas to produce hash oil from marijuana, a process known as butane hash oil (BHO) extraction. He had stored the gas in a 2-liter bottle that he placed in a freezer, which resulted in the freezer being filled with concentrated butane gas that only required a spark to ignite.

Though no one was hurt by the explosion and the house did not catch fire, Grove City Police Capt. Jeff Pearson said it was significant.

"The (refrigerator) door blew across the room and broke the dry wall," Pearson said. "(The fridge) turned into an oval shape."

In addition, investigators also found a marijuana grow operation in Lawrence's basement, with at least 15 mature plants. Investigators also found nearly 10 pounds of packaged marijuana, hallucinogenic mushrooms, 14 guns, and various "how-to" books and DVDs on cultivating marijuana.

Lawrence told police he had learned about the BHO method from Internet sources, according to the release.

There was another man in the apartment at the time of the explosion, but he was not charged.

"He was in the apartment, but there was nothing to tie him to the actual drugs," Pearson said.

Pearson said the hash oil is smoked by being poured into an electronic cigarette.

"If parents see their kids with electronic cigarettes, they need to suspect they might also be doing drugs," Pearson said. "It's just a way of hiding it."

Pearson said the people who try manufacture drugs this way are literally playing with fire.

"These gases are highly volatile, and it's very dangerous," he said. "Explosions can occur. Injuries can happen."