Twelve schools, the central office, and the transportation department in the Hilliard City School District were plunged into darkness after a wind storm swept through Ohio on Sept. 14, knocking out electricity, uprooting trees, ripping roofs from residential property and causing minor damage.

Twelve schools, the central office, and the transportation department in the Hilliard City School District were plunged into darkness after a wind storm swept through Ohio on Sept. 14, knocking out electricity, uprooting trees, ripping roofs from residential property and causing minor damage.

Refrigerator units, coolers and ice from machines still working in some of the other buildings were used to keep the district's food stocks safe, according to Assistant Superintendent Tim Hamilton.

"Most of our losses were dated items, like milk," he said. "We had lots of people help us out."

Dave Wilson of Aramark offered a great deal of assistance, according to Hamilton.

While Davidson High School lost its power, he said, Darby High School still had electricity.

Carrie Bartunek, the school-community relations coordinator, said when she talked with Hamilton on Sept. 15 the food was being transferred from one school to the others which had power.

The district used two of its five calamity days during the storm, according to Bartunek.

Schools were closed on Sept. 15 and Sept. 16.

Power was restored to all of the buildings, except Ridgewood Elementary, on Sept. 17.

"The rest of us were here and working," Bartunek said.

Hamilton said that they had to reboot and reprogram several of the computers as the electricity came up.

"Brown Elementary was up with two of its lines and without the third," he said. "That was a real challenge for us."

The telephone system also crashed and had to be reprogrammed to be operational.

Although the third high school -- Bradley -- is still under contraction, Hamilton said they were fortunate to have most of the materials under roof.

The wind tossed around a few materials outside and the construction workers were unable to be on the site on Sept. 15, but the next day, everyone was back at work.

"We had no losses, other than time," said Hamilton.

The woods in back of the school are still intact, he said, although trees were knocked down across the state.

As of Sept. 18, Bartunek said, some people were still without power in their homes, such as Assistant Superintendent Leslie McNaughton and Superintendent Dale McVey's secretary.

Despite Gov. Ted Strickland's declaration of a State of Emergency in Ohio, Bartunek said the district still only has five calamity days.

"It doesn't matter the circumstances," she said.

If the district goes over its five allotted days, Bartunek said, the time is typically made up at the end of the school year, but that decision is left up to McVey.