Bubba is the name that best suited the Angus and Maine-Anjou crossbred pinned up in the winner's row at the Franklin County Fair, according to owner Cody Lindsey of Orient.

Bubba is the name that best suited the Angus and Maine-Anjou crossbred pinned up in the winner's row at the Franklin County Fair, according to owner Cody Lindsey of Orient.

Cody said the 1,400-pound, 16-month-old steer, which earned the title of Reserve Grand Champion, is big and not too smart.

"I hope we don't offend any Bubbas out there," said Cody's mother Heather Lindsey.

Cody, who grew up on his grandfather's farm, as did his mother, has shown animals at the Franklin County and Ohio State fairs for three years, but he got an earlier start at home.

"I helped grandpa feed the cows," said the 14-year-old, who admits to having learned more about animals after showing them.

Heather said her son has shown pigs since he was 5 or 6 years old and earned showmanship honors for Red on the Head, one of his two crossbred market pigs. Only one of his pigs made it to the fair this year, because the other hurt its leg.

Bubba was weaned on Aug. 1 of last year and was broke to lead on the halter before the Jan. 1 deadline.

The hardest part of showing animals is getting into the mindset of working with them everyday, according to Cody. After developing that mindset, he said, it becomes easy, particularly for someone like himself who enjoys handling animals. Even on cold winter days, he said, he realizes the job must be done.

"All of the steers from our farm have won Reserve," Cody said, "but the one we bought didn't."

Teddy was the steer Cody showed at the fair last year.

The crossbred got his name because he looked like a teddy bear.

"He was bullheaded," said Cody.

It is a little difficult for Cody to see the steers and pigs sold, but he understands it will happen so he tries not to get too attached.

When Bubba won Reserve Grand Champion, Heather asked Cody if he was excited. He said he was more excited for Bubba, because he did a good job.