Expenses and expenditures appear to be in good shape for this fiscal year, which ends June 30, 2010, but the future concerns Brian Wilson, treasurer of Hilliard City Schools.

Expenses and expenditures appear to be in good shape for this fiscal year, which ends June 30, 2010, but the future concerns Brian Wilson, treasurer of Hilliard City Schools.

In a couple of years, he fears that state block grants and federal stimulus money will not be available at a time when other entities are seeking additional money.

The school board unanimously approved a resolution on Sept. 28 when Superintendent Dale McVey said total funds for the current fiscal year are $219,141,889.

Wilson reminded board members that much of the revenue for this fiscal year will not be available in the next year or two.

"This has been the most interesting/challenging budget that I have done in quite some time," said Wilson, "because of the changes in state funding and also the federal stimulus dollars."

The general fund makes up 71 percent of the total funds with an appropriation of $156,432,196, according to Wilson.

"Debt service is a lot higher than normal," he said.

The district's financial adviser said he has not seen a better fiscal market in 32 years.

"Part of that is because of the federal stimulus money," Wilson said.

Significant changes will occur to the special revenue fund. In fiscal year 2009, Wilson said, a little less than $4-million was spent, while $9.6 million is being budgeted for 2010.

Over the next two years, he said, the district will have $2.8-million in special education funds from stimulus money, with $1.4-million doled out each year.

In the state fiscal stabilization fund, Wilson said, the state provides a block grant, which is used to supplement the state budget.

"We found out pretty much at the last hour in the last fiscal year that you have to budget those dollars separately, so it is part of our general fund dollars, but you have to account for it separately in a federal fund," he said. "So $2.2-million of general fund expenditures go into a fiscal stabilization fund."

Wilson said that will be good for the current budget, but there is nothing in place for the next budget year.

Title I experienced significant increases, he said, including $948,000 to be spent over two years. The most significant expenditure involves the math coaches for the Title I school buildings, according to Wilson.

Once the Title I funds are gone in two years, he said, the district will need to eliminate the teaching positions if it does not receive additional funding.

As he focused on the general fund, Wilson said, the largest portion is spent on personnel. Sixty-five percent of the $156,432,196 is spent on salaries, while 22 percent is spent on fringe benefits.

By breaking the salary information down, Wilson showed that teachers consume 76.5 percent of the pie, while the administration receives 6.2 percent and classified employees account for 17.3 percent.

Historically, he said, the late 1990s and early 2000s were sound times for the general fund.

"Currently, we are in a pretty good position," Wilson said. "In 2010 we are estimating, with our current budget, we will have about a 9.5 percent carryover. I think probably that we won't spend every dollar of our budget."

He said there has been a significant increase in federal dollars in the current budget, but in two years it will not be available.

At that point, he said, programs such as special education will be moved back into the general fund.

"At some point the economy will recover," he said, "but it certainly is a lagging effect right now."