The parent of a Hilliard City School District student says she was surprised to learn that after complaining about the behavior of a teacher there was no record of that complaint in the teacher's personnel file.

The parent of a Hilliard City School District student says she was surprised to learn that after complaining about the behavior of a teacher there was no record of that complaint in the teacher's personnel file.

That teacher, 43-year-old Michael Highman, a teacher and coach at Weaver Middle School, was arrested last week on federal charges of possessing and distributing child pornography. Highman has since resigned and surrendered his educator licenses to the state.

Pam Moore said she e-mailed a complaint about Highman to school district officials in 2006, but there was no mention of it in the teacher's personnel file.

"There needs to be some kind of procedure in place so that if parents do have a concern or something is brought up, some sort of follow-through or a note is made, because now I have concerns that maybe I'm not the only person that came forward," Moore said.

She was told by school officials that then-principal Ed O'Reilly discussed the matter with Highman, but that "we have very strict guidelines about what goes into a personnel file."

O'Reilly is now superintendent of the Grandview Heights City School District.

The Hilliard Board of Education dealt with Highman's resignation Monday night as part of the consent agenda, which lumped together the resignation and other personnel actions. They were approved in a single unanimous 5-0 vote.

Also included on the consent agenda was a student trip by the Hilliard Bradley Orchestra to Chicago next May, although board member Denise Bobbitt said "we should review our policy about time away from school."

Treasurer Brian Wilson discussed five resolutions regarding debt issuance for the district. Four of the resolutions involved refinancing to pay for construction and renovation projects at Hoffman Trails Elementary, Scioto Darby, Hilliard Station Sixth Grade and other schools.

"This fiscal refinancing will allow us to maintain our current bond millage at 6.3," Wilson said.

The other resolution allows the district to issue bonds to replace the $10-million note that the district has rolled over annually since 2007.

"Is this typical to restructure things like this?" Bobbitt asked of the debt issuance.

"In these times, more so than you've seen in the past, basically, you're restructuring the principal of your debt in order to maintain the millage," Wilson said. "If we didn't do anything, our bond millage would have to increase over 7 mills by next year, and a little higher the year after that."

The five resolutions were approved unanimously.