Potholes are a byproduct of bad winters, and Hilliard's crews are working to repair them on a daily basis, according to public service director Clyde Seidle.

Potholes are a byproduct of bad winters, and Hilliard's crews are working to repair them on a daily basis, according to public service director Clyde Seidle.

"It's been an unusual winter," Seidle said. "We typically have potholes after winter, but it's just not as severe as what we've had this year."

Seidle recently told city council that his crews will work hard to patch potholes along hard-hit places like Alton & Darby Creek and Cosgray roads. It's not anything they wouldn't normally do, he said.

"It is a bigger problem than normal," Seidle said. "Because of the level of the temperatures and things like that, and the refreeze-thaw cycle, when you have ice that's there melting in between the cracks, it's kind of like the perfect storm for potholes."

Seidle said there are two ways to patch a pothole hot or cold method. The hot asphalt involves cleaning out the pothole and putting hot asphalt and limestone in place. The cold patch is another common method the hole is cleaned and a bag of the cold patch is poured in. It can be used in any weather.

"It doesn't have to have heat that comes out of the back of a hot mix truck," Seidle said of the cold patch. "It's not any different than you see in other communities. Everybody's using the same type of strategies. Larger communities have things where they have a heat welder, and we don't have anything like that."

Although he and city crews are on the lookout for potholes, Seidle wants citizens to report them, too, by calling the city at 614-876-7361 or by using the city's online service request center at hilliardohio.gov.

"If we someone calls us and says there's a pothole on such and such street, we go out investigate if it's something we need to do immediately or it can be put into the normal routine of when we go out to patch potholes. If it's deep enough to cause damage, then we get somebody out immediately. That's when they typically have cold patch."

Although the pothole patchwork in winter is nothing new for Hilliard, sending out chipper crews this time of year is, thanks to an ice storm that happened at the end of January and the beginning of February.

"This could go on another 3-4 weeks," Seidle said of the chipper service. "Normally we start our weekly passes in the early spring, when people are doing their yard (work). It's not typical for a winter here in Ohio."

gbudzak@thisweeknews.com

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