With highs in the upper 90s and humidity well over 50 percent, Franklin County Fair workers said had anticipated decreased attendance for the 2011 event.

With highs in the upper 90s and humidity well over 50 percent, Franklin County Fair workers said had anticipated decreased attendance for the 2011 event.

"This is the hottest it's ever been," said Michelle Cordle, who has attended the fair with her family for the past 10 years. "It's dead compared to every other year."

On the bright side, no one had to wait in line.

Alyssa Justus, who sells livestock at the fair's annual auction, said she had to wash her animals with cold water three times a day to keep them from fainting.

"You step outside and right when you put your boots on, you're sweating already," Justus said. "We worry about the animals. They're sucking down gallons and gallons of water."

Fair worker Mark Pethtel said some staffers were getting sick, too. As a designated "break guy," Pethtel walked through the fairgrounds, making sure workers were feeling OK and giving breaks to those who needed them.

"It's been really bad," he said. "We've had six or seven guys pass out."

But Pethtel and Justus said the Franklin County Fair board did the best it could to prepare for the heat.

The fairgrounds were spotted with industrial-size fans, misters, and dozens of places to buy water, said senior board member Allison Rushley.

"We're never sure what the weather is going to be, so we are always prepared," she said.

Although attendance was down, Rushley said it was a good run with great entertainment, and she's looking forward to next year's fair.