The next phase of the Hilliard triangle project began last week, which will complete the work at the Scioto Darby Road/Main Street roundabout.

The next phase of the Hilliard triangle project began last week, which will complete the work at the Scioto Darby Road/Main Street roundabout.

According to city transportation engineer Letty Schamp, during this phase of construction:

Northbound and southbound traffic on Main Street will be maintained around the center island.

Scioto Darby Road will be closed to through traffic across Main Street; however, right turns will be permitted (east and west sides) at the intersection. The section of Scioto Darby Road between Main Street and High School Drive may continue to be closed during daytime work hours to allow workers to safely finish work in the median.

Cemetery Road will continue to be used as the detour, but most traffic can use High School Drive and/or the Main Street/Cemetery Road roundabout to maneuver around this closure.

Work along Scioto Darby Road near Memorial Middle School will continue. Two-way traffic through this area will be maintained.

All other roads will remain open to traffic. Access to local businesses will be maintained.

"We're hoping the roundabout out at Main and Scioto Darby is completely done by the time school starts," Schamp said. "The work along Scioto Darby road near Memorial Middle School will hopefully be done towards the end of September. So that will be the main work that will still be going on when school starts.

"Then in October, we'll be doing a final paving and the final landscaping, which should set us up pretty well for our official completion date in the middle of November," she said.

Despite a soggy spring, the steamy summer has helped keep the project on track, Schamp said.

When the triangle project is completed, the roundabouts should save time for commuters, Schamp said.

"Where people should really see the improvement is in those off-peak times where they used to have to sit at a traffic signal when nobody was there," Schamp said. "If you think about the amount of time that we waste sitting at traffic signals where no one is coming from the other direction, you really start to notice how much time savings you have overall.

"Maybe not necessarily at 5 p.m. is it significantly different in your delay," she said, "but as a whole, we're going to have much more aesthetically pleasing intersections that can handle good volumes of traffic and also slow traffic down, and keep it a safe environment for pedestrians. All in all, I think it's a good package."