Fifth-graders at Alton Darby Elementary School and residents of Altercare of Hilliard bridged generations last week.

Fifth-graders at Alton Darby Elementary School and residents of Altercare of Hilliard bridged generations last week.

Alton Darby students chose to visit the assisted-living community on Trueman Boulevard as part of a public-service requirement known as a capstone project.

The students spent several hours April 28 working with staff members and residents on a number of projects, including planting indoor flowers, creating posters and participating in interactive activities designed for each to learn from the other.

Hilliard City Schools collaborated with the central Ohio-based nonprofit organization See Kids Dream to plan the visit.

Shannon Ward, a fifth-grade teacher at Alton Darby, said students and staff members chose to visit Altercare and used the curriculum of See Kids Dream to meet their goal.

"These kids chose helping seniors (as their capstone project). ... Other students chose to help the homeless or make donations to a food pantry," Ward said.

Laura Grindle, co-founder and executive director of See Kids Dream, said its mission is to "empower youths with the skills, motivation and confidence to make the world a better place."

Grindle said the long-term vision of See Kids Dream is to create a positive experience for children, focusing on those in the fourth and fifth grades to build a foundation for future public service and instill teamwork, communication and leadership skills that should serve them well socially and professionally.

Among the Alton Darby students participating last week were Hailey Amador and Layal Motasem.

"We're here today to help senior citizens (and) I'm having a good time," Hailey said.

Cindy Fillinger, 66, a resident of Altercare, gave pointers to students on planting marigolds and petunias.

"I enjoyed (planting flowers) with the kids," Fillinger said.

Craig Nelson, the Altercare of Hilliard administrator, said the residents and the students learned from each other.

"(Our residents) love being able to interact with the kids," he said.

Nelson said he thinks the visit teaches empathy to the students, as well as a few history lessons.

Meanwhile, residents have the benefit of reliving some of their pleasant memories and perhaps learning a few modernisms, too, he said.