The Northridge Local School District is considering a change to its grading scale to match three other county districts, with the goal of improving seniors' chances for college admission and scholarships.

The Northridge Local School District is considering a change to its grading scale to match three other county districts, with the goal of improving seniors' chances for college admission and scholarships.

During Monday's board of education meeting, high school teacher Kristen Grow said the problem with the current scale is that students are being held to a higher standard than other districts.

"We have a bit higher expectation than other districts in the area," she said. "Our A's and A-pluses are higher."

Northridge students are compensated for advanced placement courses, but Grow said teachers realize there are drawbacks because of the way the district's scale differs from other area schools.

That difference could be hurting Northridge students when they apply for college admission and scholarships, she said.

"We want to make sure we're giving their fair grade-point average," Grow said.

Northridge's current grading scale awards students with an A-plus for 100 percent for a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 4.3; an A, 95 to 99 percent, or a 4.0 GPA; an A-minus, 93 to 94 percent, 3.66 GPA; a B-plus, 91 to 92 percent, 3.33 GPA; a B, 84 to 90 percent, 3.0 GPA; a B-minus, 82 to 83 percent, 2.66 GPA; a C-plus, 80 to 81 percent, 2.33 GPA; a C, 72 to 79 percent, 2.0 GPA; a C-minus, 70 to 71 percent, 1.66 GPA; D-plus, 68 to 69 percent, 1.33 GPA; a D, 62 to 67 percent, 1.0 GPA; a D-minus, 60 to 61 percent, 0.66 GPA; and an F, zero to 59 percent for a 0.00 GPA.

Middle school teacher Jill Hotchiss said Northridge would like to use the same scale as Licking Valley, Licking Heights and Lakewood and one similar to Johnstown-Monroe.

That scale would give students an A-plus for 97 to 100 percent for a 4.33 GPA; an A, 93 to 96 percent or 4.0 GPA; and an A-minus, 90 to 92 percent, 3.66 GPA.

Johnstown-Monroe's range for an A-plus is 98 to 100 percent for a 4.33 GPA.

Grow said the proposed scale would still reward A-plus work and compensate students for weighted classes.

"It would allow our students to be more competitive, and it's comparable to other schools in the area," she said. "It would be more consistent and simplistic."

Grow added that Northridge wants to provide students with "equal footing" compared with other schools.

Superintendent John Shepard said he expects the proposed grading scale to be an ongoing topic of discussion during the next few months.

In other discussion Monday, board member Brent Garee suggested reaching out to the community like New Albany, where a board member is available at least a half-hour before board meetings.

"The board member can talk to residents without residents having to get in front of the board," he said.

Board member Troy Willeke said some people won't talk in front of a group.

"I think it's a great idea," he said. "I'll volunteer to do it next month."

Board member Mark Dann questioned the possibility of using spring break to make up snow days instead of adding days on the end of the school year.

Shepard said the calendar is part of a negotiated agreement with teachers, and spring break can't be touched.

"Families plan a year ahead for that break," he said.

In board action, Shepard was appointed as the district's superintendent for the next three years with contract terms to be negotiated at a later date.

The board also approved classified substitutes on an as-needed basis for the remainder of the 2009-2010 school year, as well as various volunteers.

The donation of used bell front baritone and case was accepted by the board from Joyce Witte.