In an effort to improve communications between the Johnstown Police Department and the village council, Police Chief Don Corbin on April 17 presented a quarterly report to council members.

In an effort to improve communications between the Johnstown Police Department and the village council, Police Chief Don Corbin on April 17 presented a quarterly report to council members.

Corbin said 47 burglaries and robberies had occurred from Jan. 1 through March 31.

"Of those 47, they were all false (alarms)," he said. "So we are operating on a high level for no reason, but there's really no cure for this. It happens in every city, and we have to continue to answer them on high alert."

"High alert" means officers respond with lights and sirens, he said.

Mayor Sean Staneart asked if a system could be put in place for the police department to charge business owners and residents when officers respond to false alarms.

Corbin said it's possible but officers would have to keep tabs on the number of false alarms per business per month. He said most of the time, it turns out to be human error.

Corbin said third-shift officers go to every business at night to make sure the doors are locked. He said it amounted to 6,300 door checks in a three-month period.

"Now that's just one door per business," Corbin said. "So every night, your business gets checked, maybe only one time. We try to do it twice, but every single night."

In the three-month period, Corbin said, officers found 24 unlocked doors.

Police officers made 575 vehicle stops in the first quarter. Of those, officers issued 194 citations, Corbin said.

He told council three shootings had occurred in the village, though no one was shot or injured, and 21 felony investigations are active.

"The active felony investigations are felonies that's been committed with no suspects, that we have to develop suspects for and make the arrests through the court system," he said.

Corbin said about a dozen registered sex offenders live in the village.

Council member Sharon Hendren said she has heard about a lot of drug problems in the village but noted that only 16 drug arrests were made in the first quarter.

"Sixteen doesn't seem very bad," she said.

"Well, the amount of arrests we got, you can probably multiply that by 10 as to what's actually being active out there," Corbin said.

He told council that Johnstown police officers participated in more than 250 training hours in the three-month period.

The police department also received for free a $2,000 radar gun from the state because of its involvement with the "Click-It or Ticket" program.

"It's an additional one, but we also have a couple (of radar guns) that's 14 years old, and that's kind of scary," Corbin said.

The police department bought a new Dodge Charger to patrol the streets. Officers also donated a bulletproof vest to Licking County Animal Control agent Paula Evans.

"She goes into a lot of crazy places with people who don't want their animals taken from them, and she's had guns pulled on her before, so we at least want to keep her safe," Corbin said.

This was the first quarterly police department report of its kind.

Village manager Jim Lenner said the chief would continue the reports throughout the year.