When Pataskala put an income-tax issue on the November ballot, city officials said failure could result in the city's inability to plow and salt some streets.

When Pataskala put an income-tax issue on the November ballot, city officials said failure could result in the city's inability to plow and salt some streets.

The levy failed, the snow came and, as city officials warned, some streets weren't touched.

Pataskala's restricted snow-removal policy didn't go unnoticed during the level 2 snow emergency Jan. 14.

"During the most recent snow events, the city has received numerous calls from residents who had questions related to the snow-removal policy," Benjamin King, assistant city administrator and director of public services, told Pataskala City Council on Jan. 20. "The director of public services fielded approximately 15 calls related to the conditions of the roads," King said. "The most frequently asked question from residents was: 'Why hasn't my street been plowed?'"

King said he explained the policy and referred people to the city's Web site. He also offered to e-mail a copy to residents upon request.

In October 2008, the city changed its snow-removal policy because of lack of funding. Pataskala City Council decided to plow and use salt on Broad Street, Main Street and Watkins Road and to plow and use grit on 15 other roads. Six roads in the city would not be plowed, and none of the city's subdivisions would be plowed unless the county declares a snow advisory or snow emergency.

King said that during the snow emergency, crews made it into subdivisions to plow the six streets. Crews worked until 10 p.m. Jan. 14 and returned to work at 4:30 a.m. Jan. 15, he said.

King said he also is working to purchase more road salt, which is costlier this year. He said the city last winter used 1,800 tons but added that crews completed more snow removal and had a much less restrictive policy in place then.

"We've never had this much restriction before," he said.

King said council directed him to purchase more salt. The lowest price he found was $75 per ton through the state, he said. King said that could bring the city's supply to 950 tons.

"We hope that will get us through the winter, but another level 2 could eat into our salt supply," he said.

In other business Jan. 20, council heard a first reading to change King's title from assistant city administrator and director of public services to director of public services.

City administrator Timothy Boland included a flow chart with his report to council, showing the city then would have a vacant position for an administrator's assistant.