Walking through an art exhibit by Joe Sinsabaugh of Granville is like taking a lesson in geometry, meteorology, archaeology and science.

Walking through an art exhibit by Joe Sinsabaugh of Granville is like taking a lesson in geometry, meteorology, archaeology and science.

Yes, science.

"To me, you can't have art without science, and you can't have science without art," Sinsabaugh said.

Two of the 50 pieces on display at the Argyle Photography & Fine Art Gallery in downtown Newark bombard the viewer with the combination of both: two Native American petroglyphs (ancient line drawings on rock) formed out of electronic pieces and parts.

"This is the modern way of showing the link between high technology and low technology," he said.

The exhibit includes an array of work in various media, many of which bridge the gap between science and art much more subtlety. A metal sculpture that hangs in the gallery entrance, for example, depicts rain, clouds and standing water. Some of the oil paintings combine geometric lines with landscape features and aspects of the sky.

Sinsabaugh, a fifth-generation Newark native, takes inspiration from all aspects of his life. He finds beauty in nature, creating wooden tables crafted from interesting cuts of wood, and from the vantage point of his full-time job as a pilot.

"There's a lot of flying influence from the skies, seeing the earth from space, also motion and the link between seeing clouds look like islands, islands look like clouds, water look like clouds and water look like mountains," he said. "This latest series (of oils) tries to visually show the geometry of nature: the linear aspect of waves, the triangular aspect of reflections."

Sinsabaugh started painting in high school and began working in other media. Creating a wooden table out of a piece of cross-cut wood came naturally, he said, after looking at the piece of wood and trying to decide how to use it.

His work has been shown in Columbus, out west and in upstate New York, but this might be the first time this many of his pieces -- both old and new -- and this many of his different media have been brought together.

"It's neat to see all of this in one place," he said.

Sinsabaugh's compilation is called "Consilience," the "unity of knowledge based on the Greek concept that order governs our cosmos." In his description of the show, Sinsabaugh explains, "Each branch of learning has properties and rules that connect to other disciplines. Physics underlies chemistry, which affects biology and thus anthropology, psychology and philosophy. Art has ties to it all." The show will be on display through Sept. 21.

The Argyle gallery is at 36 S. Third St. in downtown Newark.