The Etna Township trustees have received the annual report for the joint economic-development zone established for the ProLogis Industrial Park and the city of Newark in 2006.

The Etna Township trustees have received the annual report for the joint economic-development zone established for the ProLogis Industrial Park and the city of Newark in 2006.

The JEDZ is one of three such joint economic-development agreements in Licking County, all three of which are in Etna Township and Pataskala, and is the only one that currently has tenants producing revenue.

Total net funds received in 2010 thus far amount to more than $175,000, the bulk of which is shared between the township and the Southwest Licking Local School District. Collections in 2010 are up by 13 percent over 2009, according to the report.

"These are good numbers," said Dick Knapp, former township trustee and member of the JEDZ board. "Our JEDZ has been profitable for our township since its inception. With the economic situation in our country, let alone the state, our industrial park continues to grow."

Under the JEDZ, local governments such as townships that do not collect an income taxing may enter agreements with jurisdictions that have income taxes, such as cities, and apply the tax to designated areas. The Newark income-tax rate is 1.75 percent of wages and net profits on business.

Total payroll in the JEDZ is about $8 million, Newark tax administrator Barb Jobes said.

The funds then may be used for various purposes, including maintaining the road and other infrastructure at the site and distributing the income-tax revenues to the participating entities. The term of the agreement is 30 years.

Revenues from the JEDZ are distributed as follows: 20 percent to an improvements fund that pays for roadways and infrastructure at the JEDZ property, 30 percent to Etna Township, 30 percent to Southwest Licking schools, 10 percent to the city of Newark, 5 percent to Licking County, 4.5 percent to the Newark Income Tax Department for administering the JEDZ and 0.5 percent to Career & Technology Education Centers.

Newark treasurer Jeff Hall estimated that the JEDZ is about two-thirds developed, with vacant land still available.

"It will increase each year, both because of new tenants and growth in sales of the current tenants," Hall said.

The city of Newark pays its JEDZ revenue into its general fund, Hall said. Etna Township earmarks its JEDZ revenue for special purposes.

"The township trustees earmarked the money we received and put it to a new plow truck," Knapp said. "I think it came in at around $80,000, which is money that did not have to come out of the regular township budget."

Knapp said the 20 percent of the JEDZ revenue held in the improvements fund also saves the township money.

"We had to do some paving in that zone, and the JEDZ paid for that, so the township did not have to allocate that money from our road-and-bridge funds," Knapp said. "Our JEDZ is performing well for the township, and the residents should be proud of themselves for understanding that it is valuable to us and approving it."