The Pataskala City Council street committee met Aug. 22 to discuss a "roadway asset management plan," or RAMP, that would provide a long-term engineering and budgeting approach to maintaining city streets.

The Pataskala City Council street committee met Aug. 22 to discuss a "roadway asset management plan," or RAMP, that would provide a long-term engineering and budgeting approach to maintaining city streets.

City administrator Tim Boland said the plan represented a compromise between engineering needs and the budget, with engineering standards calling for a two-year window for immediate street repairs, but one repair that would probably be stretched out over five years to accommodate a limited budget.

"We tried to look at the 13 major projects that should be done within a two-year time frame and cost more than $100,000," Boland said.

Council member Dan Hayes said the budget would take precedence over road conditions.

"I doubt we can afford to do all the zero-to-two-year projects in two years," Hayes said.

Finance director Jason Carr said the 2012 projection was for expenditures of approximately $3.9 million, of which, about $1.6 million could be identified from existing revenues, primarily the income tax. The balance would have to be financed.

Boland said the RAMP classifies streets into five categories:

Category A for the highest-priority streets, where high volume and high speeds have led to safety issues.

Category B, which includes other high-volume streets where safety was less of an issue.

Category C, which includes secondary, local roads with critical repair needs.

Category D, which includes neighborhoods with lower-volume roads.

General maintenance.

Boland said the RAMP called for spending annual maintenance money, approximately $250,000, in a single ward, rather than dividing the funds across the wards. Boland said this would achieve two purposes, including providing a more visible impact from more extensive road upgrades in a given area; it also would save money because construction and repair crews would have lower mobilization costs because they would be working in fewer areas each season.

Hayes said concentrating repairs in one ward at a time was wise.

"I really like the idea of allocating the full amount to a particular ward," Hayes said. "For instance, in 2012, we're looking at a significant improvement in Havens Corners, and it seems kind of silly to throw $25,000 at wards 2 and 3 when they're getting $2.8 million (from current projects)."

Carr said funds for 2012 projects could be reasonably identified, but 2013 funding is a question mark.

"I think it's a fantastic plan," Hayes said. "I can't wait to hear how we're going to pay for it."

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