Pataskala City Council members voted 7-0 to adopt the Sterling Theater Renovation Group's vision for the front of the old town hall building on Main Street.

Pataskala City Council members voted 7-0 to adopt the Sterling Theater Renovation Group's vision for the front of the old town hall building on Main Street.

Now the group just needs to find a way to pay for it.

Renovation group member Dean Ramsey on April 16 described a plan for the town hall building, which is home to both the Sterling Theater and the Pataskala Police Department.

Essentially, the plan opens up public space in front of the building, which is currently sidewalk and grass. A large, hard surface would create an area for seating and small gatherings.

Also, flagpoles would be moved to the front of the building with a 13-foot lighted kiosk between them. It would announce the police department and the theater, he said, and it would have a space to list activities and events in the building.

Plans also call for moving a Vietnam memorial to Veterans' Green.

"It enhances the public space. That's the primary goal of the Ramsey plan," city administrator Tim Boland said.

Ramsey said the plan was still in the "preliminary" stage. He said some engineering details need to be addressed and the city is not providing funding for the plan.

Council president Dan Hayes said the council might be willing to approve matching funds if the renovation group can secure a grant, but for now, no funding is approved.

Hayes said council adopted Ramsey's vision for the front of the building as the city's vision, meaning it would be unnecessary for the renovation group to seek further permission from council should the group secure funding and have the ability to begin construction.

"When I approached Dean, my idea was that we develop a plan that can be used quickly so it's in place if or when an opportunity (to fund it) comes along. Then we can move on it," Pataskala Mayor Steve Butcher said. "I told him that it had to be a plan that we would be able to have parts of it pulled out and accomplished separately, as this wasn't a project that we had funds to pay for.

"We need the ability to capture any opportunity that may come along to include grants, as well as donations from a local organization or businesses who want to take on part of this project."

The mayor said completing the plan is possible even without public funding.

"The volunteer organizations and my administration have a great track record showing that projects like this are not only doable but are done at little or no cost to the local taxpayers," Butcher said.