Earlier this month, Marysville city council decided that it needed some community input before deciding whether or not to add commuter credits to a pending municipal income tax increase.

Earlier this month, Marysville city council decided that it needed some community input before deciding whether or not to add commuter credits to a pending municipal income tax increase.

Now that residents have spoken up in two public forums this month, city leaders are wondering if they gathered enough input to move forward.

About 100 residents sat down with city leaders between two meetings on Jan. 13 and Jan. 20, according to council president John Gore. Gore said as of right now, the commuter credit decision has not been made.

"There's not a question on the table as of yet," Gore said. "At this point, if someone on council or the mayor is interested in coming forward with a resolution, then we'll go through the normal process."

Council members voted in December to put an issue before voters on the May ballot that would raise the city's municipal income tax from 1.0- to 1.5-percent. Many residents have voiced interest in a 0.25 percent or even a 0.5 percent credit on the increase for those who live in Marysville but commute to another municipality, where they are also being taxed.

While the two forums were well attended by the public, many residents spoke up about the idea of raising the income tax at all, or other issues. Although officials didn't get as much input on commuter credits as they would like, simply hearing from that many residents at once was helpful, said councilman Mark Reams.

"It was a little different than what I expected, a lot of people just talked about the general issue, with some talking about commuter credits," Reams said. "But on the other hand, we haven't heard much of anything for awhile. It was good to hear their input."

Reams said he believes that before the council can make a decision on whether or not to add a commuter credit to the issue, a closer look must be taken on how that would affect the city's finances on a broader scale.

Mayor Chris Schmenk said she thinks city leaders need to hear more from the voters.

"I think we need more, and I think the council is deciding how best to get it," Schmenk said. "One suggestion I would make is that I would encourage residents to call city hall a little more than they think they should - we need the input."

Schmenk said the city has until about the beginning of March to come to a final decision on the commuter credit issue.

Gore said that personally he thinks a tax credit for Marysville commuters will end up on the ballot.

"I personally believe that the folks looking for a credit came out pretty strong (at the public forums)," Gore said. "Those that were opposed to the idea, there were only a couple of them. I think we're going to do it."