Marysville Exempted Village School District Superintendent Larry Zimmerman has agreed to a temporary suspension of the showing of PG-13 and R-rated films in high school classes.

Marysville Exempted Village School District Superintendent Larry Zimmerman has agreed to a temporary suspension of the showing of PG-13 and R-rated films in high school classes.

A large contingent of district parents voiced their concerns about the showing of these films as part of the curriculum during the school board's Feb. 22 meeting.

Following a lengthy discussion, Zimmerman imposed the temporary ban, pending a thorough discussion of the instructional value and content-appropriateness of the films.

"(These films) are not appropriate for our kids to watch in school," parent Tamara Bowers said, addressing the board. "Any educational purpose will never outweigh the other things they leave the classroom with."

High school student Dakota Bowers told board members watching parts of "Saving Private Ryan" made her "sick inside" and that her teacher did not send advance notice home to parents about the use of the film.

It was the Bowers' second trip to a board meeting to address this concern, the first coming in October.

Zimmerman said he reviewed the issue with Bowers, principal Matt Chrispin and faculty members, and that the school agreed to communicate what movies would be shown and to explain the rationale.

Chrispin said the school conducted an audit following the October meeting and that seven of these kinds of films are being used in classes that "can be taken by freshmen and sophomores."

"Last week, we had a faculty member not notify parents," Zimmerman told ThisWeek. "It's our fault."

At Monday's meeting, Bowers reiterated her concerns, adding that she believed a ban on PG-13 and R rated movies in classrooms was warranted.

"I'd love to have what she's saying as policy," board member Doug Lassiter said, "but I'm not sure of the procedure."

Board president Jeff Mabee suggested the need to hear from faculty and staff before making formal board policy on the topic.

"Our practice should be what the community standard is, but to say just blanket to anything, I don't know," Zimmerman said. "I also have to look at the educational value in each case. The trouble with a blanket 'no' is you have to have some dialogue."

"I'm more (in agreement) than not, but understand it can't be about limiting speech or about what's comfortable," Zimmerman added.

"I agree with not having a blanket 'no' but if (Bowers) leaves here without some sort of stay that's just a blanket 'yes,'" Lassiter said.

"I know that I don't like to hear what I hear from your daughter," Zimmerman told Tamara Bowers. "I'm OK with putting it on hold for a bit."

The board discussed briefly the notion of a public meeting on the subject, but no decision was made. Zimmerman advised that these types of decisions also require smaller meetings with the various involved parties. No deadline for a final determination on the subject was set.