As Marysville's city council and city staff continue to work on the code that regulates how business owners may conduct temporary advertising in their shop frontages, several of those business owners said recently that they think the idea may be bad for business.

As Marysville's city council and city staff continue to work on the code that regulates how business owners may conduct temporary advertising in their shop frontages, several of those business owners said recently that they think the idea may be bad for business.

"I've lived here about 40 years, and when we first moved here every shop in Uptown was full," said Donna Riegler, who owns a consignment shop in Uptown Marysville. "I couldn't tell you what the signs looked like then, and people didn't care, and the shops were full."

Riegler said that while she has been in business for about a year, she has stopped bothering with temporary signs.

"I quit trying to put up the signs," she said. "I didn't want to have to beg for permission every time I wanted to have a sale."

Joe Duke, who owns Duke Insurance, Goodies Galore and Goodies-N-More in the Uptown area, said local criticism of the signage issue is a reflection of the current national attitude toward government intrusion.

"Right now economic times are hard, and people everywhere are getting tired of government getting bigger and bigger, wanting us to service them more and more," Duke said. "My taxes are already $10,000 a year, and they want to micro-manage what I do with my windows. That's not their job."

For nearly a year the city has been working on just what it's code should say pertaining to temporary signs, what sort of uses should be allowed, how they should be permitted, and where they can be placed. City leaders have said a uniform, universally accepted code needs to be in place to make sure the rules are not enforced inconsistently from one business to the next.

The changes have been workshopped by the council's planning commission, public affairs committee, city staff and city council itself.

Lonestar Quilting owner Debbie Wheeler said that advertising in these economic times can make the difference whether some businesses survive or not.

"My customers are quilters, and for the most part they are pretty persistent, but the biggest complaint I receive is that they can't find my store," Wheeler said. "I question how much business I've lost because of that.

"I understand that we need some sort of regulations for the bigger retailers, but things need to be a little easier for the smaller businesses," she said. "It took me half a day the last time I went to get a sign permit, and that's time where I have to close my shop."

Duke said he understands the city's comments that the code is also intended to help make Uptown a pleasing sight for potential customers and entrepreneurs.

"But you have to understand, (business owners) don't want crap in our windows either," he said. "This is just control, it's not about making things look nice. Don't get me wrong let's have some regulations, but let the business community itself police them. The city's reputation in this community is that they are not business-friendly."

City council intends to vote on the proposed changes on Dec. 2. A complete list of the changes can be found on the city's website at www.marysvilleohio.org.