While it isn't common for a client to be trucking waste to Marysville's sewage-treatment plant, those are the sort of contracts that pique the city's interest, according to city administrator Jillian Froment.

While it isn't common for a client to be trucking waste to Marysville's sewage-treatment plant, those are the sort of contracts that pique the city's interest, according to city administrator Jillian Froment.

Two weeks ago, Marysville was approached by an unnamed client interested in doing business with the city's sewage-treatment plant. The client was represented by Edwin Hanson, project manager for Penn National Gaming's large-scale casino project in Franklin Township on the West Side of Columbus.

When asked whether Penn National is the unnamed client, company spokesman Bob Tenenbaum said Penn National is not commenting on anything related to sewer or water service while negotiating with Columbus.

Columbus has told Penn National that the city won't provide sewer and water services unless the 123-acre site along West Broad Street near I-270 is annexed. The casino developer, after agreeing to move the project from its original Columbus location in the Arena District, has asked the city for as much as $10-million in incentives, but city officials have balked at agreeing to that proposal. Columbus could make an estimated $24-million in annual taxes if the casino is in the city; it would only net $16-million if it doesn't annex.

Regardless of the client's identity, Froment said a contract like this could work well for Marysville.

"These types of clients are great for the city because the costs associated with providing sewage service, such as maintaining lines and infrastructure, don't fall on us," Froment said. "Because of that, projects like this help to offset the residents' costs for maintaining the infrastructure."

Froment said Marysville would have no problem handling the load, estimated at about 120,000 gallons per day. Marysville's sewage-treatment plant was built to handle 8-million gallons per day; it is currently licensed to process 6-million gallons, and on a day-to-day basis, processes about 4-million gallons, she said.

"(120,000 gallons) is not a large amount in the grand scheme of things when compared to our other clients, for instance, Honda," Froment said.

Processing 120,000 gallons of waste daily for a private client would net Marysville approximately $25,754.71 per month in user fees, Froment calculated. That figure could be a conservative estimate; she said Hanson indicated in their meeting that 120,000 gallons could turn into 180,000 gallons per day.

Froment declined to speculate on the likelihood of an agreement being reached between Marysville and the client, but said the ball is in the client's court.

"We're happy to talk with anyone it's a commodity we're in the business of selling," she said. "It's also not uncommon to have a situation like this where the point of contact does not disclose who their client is. We don't have any further meetings scheduled at this point; we left that option with them, and if they want to discuss the possibility further, we'll be waiting to hear from them."

Elizabeth Gibson and Holly Zachariah of The Columbus Dispatch contributed to this story.