Marysville's financial outlook strengthened and many infrastructure improvements were made in 2010, Mayor Chris Schmenk said in her annual State of the City address.

Marysville's financial outlook strengthened and many infrastructure improvements were made in 2010, Mayor Chris Schmenk said in her annual State of the City address.

Schmenk delivered the annual update on Marysville's status at the Jan. 27 city council meeting.

Strong developments for Marysville's finances were a hallmark of last year, she said.

"Over the last year, we have worked hard to build a stronger Marysville," Schmenk said. "Our work began with taking steps necessary to strengthen our finances."

That involved running a successful campaign to increase the city's income tax rate, she said, a task at which the city failed during the previous year.

"We had to pick ourselves up from a loss in 2009, and we had to do everything we could to reach voters," she said.

That tax increase played a role in the city receiving an MIG 1 rating for short-term notes from Moody's Investors Services last year, the highest rating possible, Schmenk said.

Marysville's safety services made a concerted effort to deal with drugs on the streets in 2010, she continued.

"Our police division continues to be aggressive in the fight against illegal drugs," she said. "During the spring of 2010, grand jury indictments were returned on 12 individuals. This investigation, which began in late 2009, involved trafficking in heroin and prescription drugs within the city of Marysville. Investigators seized 110 doses of heroin, along with approximately 105 unit doses of prescription drugs, including Oxycontin and Percocet."

Schmenk said some significant infrastructure work was accomplished last year, including the completion of the North Main Street sanitary sewer project, completion of the city's storm water management policy, substantial completion of the city's Job Ready Site, the completion of an agreement to provide water and sanitary sewer service with the Jerome Village Community Authority, reducing the city's water hardness, along with other projects.

Building a new municipal court and police facility will take much of the city's focus in the coming year, she added.

"The devil can be in the details, but (city staff) will work out the issues, and we are confident that we will emerge with the best possible facilities for our community while keeping to our modest budget," she said.

Infrastructure improvements in 2011, such as preparing for the new water treatment plant to come online, will also be a focus, Schmenk said.

"As the economy rebounds, we hope our city will realize additional smart growth, as our new water reclamation facility is designed to meet the needs of this optimistic future," she said. "We will continue to work hard with our economic development director, Eric Phillips, to market our Uptown and our entire community as an ideal place to live, work and play."

Schmenk concluded by thanking the city council and the city staff for their support.

"I have an ever-growing sense of respect for our citizens, our staff and our elected officials, who work together because of our love of Marysville," she said. "When I look to the future, I know that with your talents and your motivation, we will build an even stronger Marysville."