An updated revitalization plan presented Thursday, April 26, to Marys-ville City Council shows gateway areas outside the core of the city's historic Uptown area, more residential properties in the form of townhomes along North Main Street and a restored Town Run with walkways.

An updated revitalization plan presented Thursday, April 26, to Marys-ville City Council shows gateway areas outside the core of the city's historic Uptown area, more residential properties in the form of townhomes along North Main Street and a restored Town Run with walkways.

City Planner Greg DeLong said the next step is to get City Council to adopt the vision presented in the update, then to aggressively recruit private developers and secure funding.

The city will have to move into tangible actions such as modifying any zoning or historic district guidelines to get things started, he said.

It will take a couple of years to get the plan off the ground, but DeLong said it will be worth it.

"We hope this plan will take our town to the next level in years to come," he said.

The 2006 Uptown Marysville Revitalization Plan "was a catalyst for us to get Tier II grant money a few years ago, which was a $400,000 grant that led to a couple of million dollars investment Uptown," DeLong said.

He said the update is necessary in order for the city to remain competitive for future Community Development Block Grant funds from the Ohio Department of Development.

"It's great to have this plan updated," he said. "The plan can't be any more than five years old to qualify, and this one is six years old."

The proposal outlined for council last week includes the addition of new buildings along North Main Street, gateway signage and landscaping, and bridge enhancements.

It also includes plans for expanded public gathering areas and a connection to the existing trail network, with green space and a pavilion or stage, as well as professional office spaces and a pedestrian bridge over Mill Creek to connect to the Jim Simmons Multiuse Trail.

The update was created with the input of Uptown business and property owners, city staff members, the Union County Chamber of Commerce, Marysville residents and MSI/KKG, the consultants hired to develop the plan.

The update cost $20,000 – a relatively inexpensive price for such a plan, DeLong said. Half of the cost was paid with grant money.

The city needs another Tier II grant to execute the updated plan, but it will take a couple of years to go through the lengthy application process, he said.

Craig Grossman from MSI/KKG outlined the background, market conditions update, master plan and implementation process. He also presented information highlighting expected growth over the next 20 to 30 years along the U.S. Route 33 corridor from Columbus to Marysville.

"Obviously, one of the great brand identities of Marysville is its terrific history, the historic core of buildings surrounding Downtown," Grossman said. "There's great historic stock within that area."

He pointed out that commercial growth has slowed, and in fact, he said, there has not been a new mall built in the United States in the last five years. Places such as Easton in Columbus or open-air lifestyle centers have replaced traditional malls and are trying to represent what a downtown historically represents, he said.

"We can find a way to start channeling energy and financial resources right now," Grossman said. "It's a very critical moment and we can get ahead of the rest of the commercial development that's somewhat stalled."