Marysville Mayor John Gore is a volunteer basketball coach at Fairbanks High School. Marysville City Administrator Terry Emery says he and his brother grew up playing basketball in their driveway.

Marysville Mayor John Gore is a volunteer basketball coach at Fairbanks High School. Marysville City Administrator Terry Emery says he and his brother grew up playing basketball in their driveway.

But both say Marysville city streets are no place for basketball.

"It's created, in many cases, situations that aren't real safe," Emery said.

That's why the city is cracking down on residents who have portable basketball hoops erected on sidewalks, in the streets, alleys or in any area that, according to city code, hinders traffic visibility or obstructs pedestrians.

Violation of these ordinances is considered a misdemeanor.

City Planner Greg Delong said he hopes the situation can be cleaned up with no problems.

"Our goal is not to get to a penalty process," DeLong said.

The city has a list of more than 100 addresses that are violating the laws, but Emery said there is a plan to get residents to comply. The city will distribute door hangers explaining the codes and asking that the hoops and posts be removed from rights of way, sidewalks and streets.

"In some cases, we have situations where there is a basketball goal on one side of the street and another goal on the other side and the kids are playing full court," Emery said.

Around 30 days after a resident receives notification, the city will determine if it must send another letter to those still in violation.

Emery said the situation started long ago and has snowballed to the point the city must take action.

Some residents have called asking the city to enforce the code because of the hoops in their neighborhoods, while others have called to blame the city for damage that occurred because of the violations.

"We've had people call us up and say, 'What are you going to do? My basketball goal came down when you were plowing; are you going to replace it?'

"I've had to explain to them that their goal was in the right of way and violating city code means the city was not responsible for the damage," he said.

"What we're asking people to do is to begin the process of seeking alternatives they may have. We have many city parks or schools that already have goals or baskets.

"When the city has something in code such as this, and a child gets struck by a car or hurt, people are going to come to the city and ask why the code wasn't enforced," Emery added. "We do have an obligation."

He said he looks back to his own love of basketball and understands people want to have fun at their own homes.

"When I grew up, my brother and I were hardcore basketball players," he recalled. "My parents had a basketball hoop on our house, and we played on that basket relentlessly."

However, he said, people should keep the game in the driveway, not the street.

"We're going to try to do everything so people know what their options are," he said.