Marysville City Council's public-affairs committee is preparing a new city ordinance to address Internet sweepstakes cafes and/or skill game rooms piece by piece.

Marysville City Council's public-affairs committee is preparing a new city ordinance to address Internet sweepstakes cafes and/or skill game rooms piece by piece.

Members have agreed on provisions in the proposed legislation that would allow one such business per every 5,000 residents, according to federal census data. With 20,000 residents in Marysville, that leaves room for four such establishments in the city. Three such businesses are currently operating in Marysville.

The proposed ordinance also sets the fee for each business at $500 per year and fees for each computerized sweepstakes device in each business at $25 per device per year.

Committee chairwoman Deborah Groat said the committee has three main objectives: Limit the number of Internet sweepstakes cafes and/or skill game rooms in town; establish appropriate licensing procedures; and establish appropriate fees.

The committee has held public hearings once a month since council enacted a moratorium on such game rooms in December. The original six-month moratorium has been extended twice and is now set to expire in June 2013.

The main debate at the committee's July 23 meeting was about a portion of the proposed ordinance that deals with conditions and regulations.

One condition says at least one adult operator "who has not been convicted of any felony or of any misdemeanor involving the operation of a sweepstakes terminal cafe and/or skill game rooms or involving physical violence, gambling activities, controlled substances, alcoholic beverages, minors or any crime involving moral turpitude" must be in the business during all hours of operation.

Committee member J.R. Rausch was concerned about so many stipulations when many times, the businesses are run with one person on duty.

Rausch said the restrictions exclude potential workers with one or two minor charges on their records, such as a driving drunk charge or an assault charge. He said no other businesses restrict hiring people with what might be one mistake on their records.

Groat believes such charges are grounds for keeping potential employees out of the Internet sweepstakes cafes and/or skill game rooms.

Jim Haning, owner of Games People Play, said most of his employees are paid minimum wage and are looking for an opportunity.

"Sometimes they carry baggage. What we try to do is give them a chance to work and be part of the community," Haning said.

"I know a lot of people that don't lose their job when they have gotten a DUI or a charge at home of domestic violence," Rausch said. "I think when we limit who can be there, we're limiting their ability to get a job."

He said he agreed that employees should be free of crimes involving gambling, controlled substances and minors, or any crime involving moral turpitude, but other stipulations needed to be dropped.

The committee agreed to consult City Law Director Tim Aslaner on the best wording of various sections of the proposed legislation.

Committee members said they hope to fine-tune the ordinance at the next meeting on Aug. 27 at 6 p.m. at City Hall before presenting it to the full council for approval.