Members of Marysville City Council's public affairs committee think they have wrapped up an eight-month process to develop legislation that would regulate Internet sweepstakes cafes/skill game rooms in the city.

Members of Marysville City Council's public affairs committee think they have wrapped up an eight-month process to develop legislation that would regulate Internet sweepstakes cafes/skill game rooms in the city.

The committee has met once a month since December 2011, when Mayor John Gore requested a moratorium on allowing the businesses in Marysville.

One of the main points of discussion in the past few meetings was the number of such businesses to allow in the city. The original suggestion was for one business per 5,000 residents.

On Aug. 27, Marysville City Council member Dan Fogt, who does not sit on the committee, suggested one business per 7,000 residents.

"You have three now, so why don't you take the current population and divide it by three?" Fogt asked.

The city currently has approximately 22,000 residents.

City Administrator Terry Emery agreed, saying the city is only going to grow. Going with 5,000 opens the city up to more establishments sooner, he said.

Committee Chair Deborah Groat, along with members Henk Berbee and J.R. Rausch, liked the idea and went with 7,000 as part of the proposed ordinance.

Another point of contention in previous meetings was that the proposed ordinance addresses the management. of each business.

"Each such licensee shall have present on the premises at all times when the premises are open to the public, at least one adult operator who has not been convicted of a felony or of any misdemeanor involving illegal gambling or the illegal operation of a sweepstakes terminal cafe and/or skill game room," the legislation says.

Law Director Tim Aslaner pointed out that the wording did not exclude violators with a history of domestic violence or DUI offenses.

"You could have a conviction for misdemeanors, such as leaving the scene of an accident, assault, trespassing, shoplifting, bad checks, you name it. All those misdemeanors are not included in this legislation right here," he said.

Rausch had originally objected to domestic violence or DUI violators being prohibited from being the only worker on duty. He was concerned it would keep people from working and contributing positively to society.

He also asked if anything in the ordinance would prohibit these businesses from hosting something such as "Girls Gone Wild."

"Is that disorderly conduct wording going to prevent something like that?" Rausch asked.

Aslaner noted the definition of disorderly conduct and prohibiting physically offensive acts inside the establishment. The definition convinced the committee members that the businesses would be unable to host such events.

Aslaner asked the committee to clarify whether a business that requested a license at a time other than the first of the year would have the fees pro-rated or if a flat fee would apply, no matter when the request was made.

Emery pointed out that no other city fees are pro-rated so each business would have to pay the entire fee, regardless of when the request was made.

The committee plans to present the full city council with the ordinance with a recommendation for approval at city council's September meeting.

"My personal feeling is it will be premiere legislation for the state," Groat said. "I think it's an excellent piece of legislation."