Marysville residents won't pay any more for trash service under the terms of a new five-year contract with Republic Services, but regular trash collection will be reduced to four days a week starting Jan. 1.

Marysville residents won't pay any more for trash service under the terms of a new five-year contract with Republic Services, but regular trash collection will be reduced to four days a week starting Jan. 1.

Monday will be designated for bulk pickup.

Residents' bills will remain at $21 a month, $15 for senior citizens.

However, thanks to the equipment Republic uses, customers will be required to use specific "toters" for trash and recyclables.

City Engineer and Deputy Public Service Director Jeremy Hoyt outlined the new contract to Marysville City Council's public service committee Nov. 18.

The biggest change will be the company's use of automated, side-loading trash trucks.

These vehicles are equipped with an arm that comes down and picks up a trash can and dumps it into the truck.

The process requires that residents use specific toters provided by Republic and included within the standard residential cost.

Hoyt said the automated process allows the company to increase its work load.

"It looks like they can be 25-30 percent more efficient," Hoyt said.

"Generally speaking, the side loaders are more efficient, will keep the streets cleaner and will result in the reduction from a five-day city-wide route to four days," Public Information Officer Anna Krutowskis said.

Residents can choose between 96-gallon or 65-gallon toters; those designated for garbage are green and those for recyclables are blue.

Residents can also get up to three extra recycle bins at no extra cost. Recyclable material will still go to Union County Recyclers.

Tracy Richardson, chairwoman of the public service committee, pointed out at the meeting that the toters are substantially heavier than a normal trash can but they do have wheels to make it easier to move them.

Hoyt said the city is still working out some details with Republic, but everything should be ready to go by the beginning of the year.

"I think it's important people know what the instructions are," Richardson said.

Hoyt assured the committee that once the details are worked out, Republic and the city will make sure to get information out in a variety of ways.

"Within the next month, our website will include an educational component for residents to learn more about these changes," Krutowskis said.