Tailgating and a chance to win a Wii might not seem like the most charitable of activities, but a group of event organizers is trying to make it so.

Tailgating and a chance to win a Wii might not seem like the most charitable of activities, but a group of event organizers is trying to make it so.

It's known as the third annual Tailgate Party and Corn Hole Tournament, slated for Sept. 13. It will benefit the Propionic Acidemia Foundation, and proceeds will help fund research for a rare disease affecting two central Ohio children.

One of them, New Albany toddler Gwen Mouat, was diagnosed with propionic acidemia shortly after birth.

According to the foundation, those with the rare disease "cannot break down parts of protein and some types of fat due to a nonfunctioning enzyme called PCC. This inability causes a buildup of dangerous acids and toxins, and it can cause damage to the organs."

The disease put Mouat in the hospital last week, but mother Jennifer Mouat said the 2-year-old still is in good spirits.

"She got out of the hospital Wednesday," Mouat said last week. "She's still in amazing spirits but not feeling 100 percent."

The disease is rare, but the PAF is funding research for ways to let children with propionic acidemia live longer and more pleasant lives. Mouat is on the board and hopes the Sept. 13 event meets the fundraising goal of $15,000.

"We're $500 away from earning $100,000," she said Tuesday. "We fully expect to go over $100,000 even before the tournament.

"All the money we've received has gone to the foundation to draw on researchers for basic research."

Mouat said more research could mean netting national funding.

"We're trying to get basic research projects started in order to draw (National Health Institute) funding," she said. "If we have basic research completed that comes up with something that could work with more funding, we would be more likely to draw on National Health Institute dollars."

Mouat said fundraisers provide about half of the research money.

"We're funding $25,000 research grants here and there," she said. "I'm probably on the board because we fund half of the research projects."

Last year, the event raised $12,000, but Mouat is hoping for 300 to 500 people and $15,000 this time.

The event will begin at noon Sept. 13 at the Goat Bar in Lifestyles Communities of Gahanna, 6400 Preserve Crossing Blvd.

The event is free, but registration for the cornhole tournament is $50 per two-person team. Teams may register at gwenforacure.com.

The top three teams will be awarded prizes of $400, $250 and $100.

Other activities include food, music, raffles and a silent auction. Ohio State University tickets, Blue Jackets tickets and a Myrtle Beach vacation will be available at the silent auction, and a Nintendo Wii will be raffled.

The event will be postponed only in the event of severe weather and rescheduled for Oct. 4.

jnoblit@thisweeknews.com