The next New Albany-Plain Local School District superintendent must be passionate about education, a visionary, collaborative and ethical, innovative and accountable, intellectually curious and a diplomatic communicator, the school board determined Aug. 30.

The next New Albany-Plain Local School District superintendent must be passionate about education, a visionary, collaborative and ethical, innovative and accountable, intellectually curious and a diplomatic communicator, the school board determined Aug. 30.

The board voted unanimously to approve a superintendent profile prepared by SC Search Consultants, the firm hired to facilitate the superintendent search, after making a few modifications.

The profile was posted Aug. 31 to the district website, www.napls.us. Search Consultants planned to begin recruiting candidates the same day, said Jennifer Sullivan, the search firm's director of recruitment and training.

During the special meeting to finalize the profile, the board decided it would welcome candidates not already serving as superintendents to apply for the position. When discussing qualifications for the profile, board members debated whether the profile should be staunch in requiring "a superintendent and/or someone with educational experience" or add that educational experience is "strongly encouraged" to allow candidates who are not superintendents to apply.

"I think it's highly unlikely that we would hire someone without educational experience," said board vice president Laura Kohler. "But, I think it's too early to narrow the pool."

Board member Mike Klein said 440 people who were surveyed said a candidate should be an educator with superintendent experience. That is his preference, as well, he said.

When assembling the profile, Search Consultants representatives considered their conversations with local "stakeholders" and the nearly 400 responses to an online survey collected last week. They also added qualifications and specifics from the Ohio Standards for Superintendents from the Ohio Department of Education. Board members considered the same sources when finalizing the profile.

Board president Mark Ryan said if the profile restricts the search to superintendents only, that would mean a law school dean or the head of a private school could not apply.

Sullivan said keeping the profile open allows Search Consultants to recruit assistant superintendents, principals and even curriculum directors.

Board member Natalie Matt asked representatives from Search Consultants what would happen if a candidate without a superintendent's license applied and became a finalist for the position.

Wilson Browning, Search Consultants' director of client development, said all candidates would be informed of the necessary licensing requirements and they would have to show that they could obtain the license in a short period of time. Also, the profile calls for a candidate to show that he or she could move into the community within a certain time period and establish residence.

Other qualifications require the district's next leader to drive success, build trust or be trusted and be a mentor who instills confidence and leads with confidence.

The next step for the board is to organize two committees to review resumes and candidates. One will be made up of staff members and teachers and the other of residents.