Residents with unused electronics are encouraged to bring them to an electronics recycling day scheduled 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 22, at the Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts, 100 W. Granville St.

Residents with unused electronics are encouraged to bring them to an electronics recycling day scheduled 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 22, at the Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts, 100 W. Granville St.

Residents may bring in complete personal computer units, hard drives, black CRT monitors, LCD monitors, computer mice, printers, cables and other computer accessories, as well as working and broken cell phones. There will be a small donation of $3 requested for any beige or white CRT monitors that will be dropped off to help cover the fees required for proper disposal.

The event is sponsored by the Community Computer Alliance of Columbus, a nonprofit organization that takes "old computers and components and refurbishes them," according to the organization's website. The machines are refurbished and donated to low-income families, senior citizens and other nonprofits.

The organization wipes all data from hard drives before refurbished computers are distributed. It does this as part of the recycling process and even offers a report of the date and time when the hard drive was emptied for a $10 fee.

If a computer cannot be reused, its useful components will be salvaged and other materials, such as plastic, metals, and circuit boards, will be melted down for future use.

The Community Computer Alliance will be assisted by volunteers from the Rotary Club of New Albany and the New Albany Chamber of Commerce.

Cary Hager of the Rotary Club said electronics recycling prevents usable machines from being taken to a landfill and provides them for people who often cannot afford a new computer. With more and more job applications being requested electronically, he said, it is increasingly difficult for people without a computer to apply for jobs.

"This can help the economy," Hager said.

Hager said there is no limit on the number of computers that will be accepted Jan. 22.

"If we have too much, we'll bring in more trucks," he said.

Recycling computers and other office machines also helps prevent hazardous materials from entering landfills, according to the Community Computer Alliance. Chemicals such as lead, mercury, cadmium, and even PCP's, can be found in switchboards, old batteries, television screens and circuit boards.

For more information, contact Community Computer Alliance at (614) 824-5587 or visit www.ccompa.org.