New Albany is updating its wastewater management permit program to ensure all federal and state standards are met and include administrative changes within the village.

New Albany is updating its wastewater management permit program to ensure all federal and state standards are met and include administrative changes within the village.

Two ordinances presented to the New Albany Planning Commission on Jan. 19 included the updates, which engineering manager Bill Dorman said were "mainly for housekeeping."

The planning commission unanimously approved the recommendation of both ordinances, with members Brad Shockey, Neil Kirby and Joe King present and Ray Silverstein and David Wallace absent.

Village planner Michelle Murphy said the village would like New Albany Village Council to approve the ordinances by March, when state reports are due.

The ordinances update the village's National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permit program it receives through the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The permits are issued to "regulate wastewater discharges by placing limitations on the quantity of pollutants that may be discharged and to establish monitoring requirements and other conditions," according to the state government website.

The changes in both ordinances are part of federal and state guidelines and protocol adopted by the village since the legislation was last updated, Dorman said.

The first ordinance would amend the village's stormwater-management and runoff-control laws.

Dorman said the village's current NPDES permit applies to only 5-acre or larger sites that were disturbed by digging, grading or some other sort of usage that could cause runoff into a local stream.

However, standards have changed and the village has changed along with them, he said, requiring projects disturbing as little as 1 acre of ground to report the pollutant controls put in place to prevent runoff.

"It affects more development, even residential home building," Dorman said.

Commission member Brad Shockey asked how the permit would apply in a residential situation and Dorman said the permit applies only to the area disturbed. As an example, he said, if a homeowner with a 1-acre lot wanted to build a driveway and the digging and grading only disturbed 0.8 acre, the permit would not apply.

The other ordinance, which would amend New Albany's soil erosion and sediment pollution laws, would allow the village to suggest more environmentally friendly or "green" technologies be used where applicable.

"We would encourage people to use best-management practices and best available technologies," Dorman said.

He said the "green" technology could be used for smaller projects, such as temporary stream crossings, and still need the village engineer's approval.