New Albany City Council has determined the city has approximately $1.3 million to spend on road resurfacing in 2012 and a projected capital-improvements fund of $4.025 million, of which only about $400,000 is not already committed to projects.

New Albany City Council has determined the city has approximately $1.3 million to spend on road resurfacing in 2012 and a projected capital-improvements fund of $4.025 million, of which only about $400,000 is not already committed to projects.

At their Jan. 20 retreat, council members decided which road projects can be completed with available funding and then tried to prioritize capital-improvements projects that total more than council has to spend.

Council members agreed 42 of the 44 road projects suggested should be completed, using the $1,299,562 available from the funds dedicated to road improvements.

Service director Mark Nemec said the city paid an engineer $8,000 to set up a database and rate all city streets based on the street's condition. From that list, Nemec said, the city identified streets in need of repairs will cluster work in neighborhoods to keep repair costs down.

The city will use the money to grind the existing asphalt off each road, repave the road, replace curbs and install handicapped-accessible ramps.

Zarley Street and Karmar Court were the two taken off the list because of potential future improvements.

Council member Chip Fellows said the city should determine if Zarley Street can be connected to Forest Drive. Council member Colleen Briscoe said if that connection is made, Zarley Street will have to be brought up to the same standards as other city streets, with street lighting, trees and sidewalks.

City manager Joseph Stefanov said the two roads might have enough right of way to rebuild but not to add sidewalks or trees.

Council members agreed to continue regular maintenance and repair of the streets, possibly planning more improvements in the future.

The projected $4.025 million in the capital-improvement fund will be used for debt repayments, bridge repairs and other road projects. All but $409,235 has been committed to projects.

The city is anticipated to have $374,801 available in the parks-and-trails improvement fund to make leisure-trail connections. However, proposed expenditures total $491,745, which exceeds the balance by $116,944. The deficit could be taken out of the unallocated $409,235, but Stefanov recommended leaving between $50,000 and $100,000 in the capital-improvements fund so it is not depleted.

In addition to the capital-improvements fund, the village center tax-increment financing (TIF) district is projected to generate $4.19 million. Council has $1,245,404 in proposed expenditures from the TIF fund for debt-service payments and proposed work to Main Street and another $20 million in project costs identified. The TIF fund can be used only for debt service on projects in the village center.

During the retreat, council members tried to prioritize village center projects but it was a slow process because each member had different priorities.

Several new projects were added to the list, including lighting of the leisure path along Dublin-Granville Road between Johnstown Road and Market Street, improvements to the park at the northeast corner of Johnstown Road and High Street and several new signs for buildings and areas in the village center.

Mayor Nancy Ferguson said by prioritizing projects, council gives Stefanov an idea of what projects are most important. She said Stefanov can then seek grants to help subsidize projects that are of highest priority to council.