Columbus residents this November could see a myriad of elections issues, including an operating levy from the school district, a potential bond and an eight- or nine-issue bond package from the city.

Columbus residents this November could see a myriad of elections issues, including an operating levy from the school district, a potential bond and an eight- or nine-issue bond package from the city.

At the April 18 meeting of the Board and City Standing Committee, which reviews issues that would affect the schools and the city, representatives updated each other on future ballot issues.

Board president Terry Boyd said that with numerous governmental organizations seeks issues, it is important for the city schools to work together to educate voters.

"Obviously the city's bond, and I understand the state may even have a bond out there, could really drive the voters this fall to be a little cross-eyed," Boyd said. "I know before I was a real educated voter every time I saw a bond or a levy automatically I just thought all this money is being drained out of my pocket.

"Hopefully there can be some type of collaboration between the schools and the city explaining what exactly we are attempting to do."

Both Boyd and city council member Andrew Ginther set tentative timelines for their respective groups.

"I anticipate by the end of May, certainly the first meeting in June, the board will begin to call special meetings specifically for the board to discuss levy amounts," Boyd said. "I am hoping by the end of June to make a decision."

The board doesn't know the operating levy amount yet, he said, and has charged the district's millage committee with researching what the district needs and then associating a dollar figure.

"We wanted them to have the benefit of understanding what our needs were prior to talking about money," Boyd said.

He added that the district has not created a campaign committee, and said it may be difficult to educate voters because of the major national races, especially the presidential election.

"The media are taking advantage of it obviously and we don't even know if we can afford having TV (advertising) to try to help us," Boyd said. "We are not going to try to spend what these other campaigns are going to try to spend."

The city's timeline nearly mirrors the district's. Ginther said. The bicentennial bond package, described as the largest in the city's history, is expected to be discussed in May and readied by July.

In other news, Seth Walker, an assistant public safety director for the city, updated the district on the city's future enforcement of Columbus' curfew. City officials are hoping the district will help get out the information.

Starting June 5 and running through Aug. 24, the city will step up its curfew enforcement and implement a new pilot program.

In the summer months, Thursdays through Saturdays, the city will partner with the downtown YMCA. Children picked up by police will be taken to the center until a parent or guardian picks them up.

Curfew for children age 13 and under is one hour after sunset to 4:30 a.m. For children ages 14 to 17, the curfew is midnight to 4:30 a.m.

Walker said a key issue for residents to note is that the curfew law is not new and no new aspects have been added.

"The issue that we faced from a patrol officer standpoint (was) if an officer saw an individual out past curfew they had no place they could take him if they took them into custody," Walker said.

He said Franklin County Children Services won't take the children, even if the officer couldn't make contact with a parent or guardian.

"Once we take them into custody we can't release them," Walker said. "That individual would have to ride with the officer and couldn't respond to calls for an hour, two hours, three hours until a parent or guardian could be located."

Walker said the pilot doesn't remove an officer's discretion. If the officer knows the area, there is an option for the child to be dropped off at home instead of at the YMCA.

Dcross@thisweeknews.com