The majority of the money that has funded the campaigns for Republican Steve Stivers and Democrat Mary Jo Kilroy, candidates for the 15th Congressional district, has come from outside Ohio.

The majority of the money that has funded the campaigns for Republican Steve Stivers and Democrat Mary Jo Kilroy, candidates for the 15th Congressional district, has come from outside Ohio.

According to pre-election campaign finance reports filed last week, Kilroy outpaced Stivers in overall contributions, with a campaign total of $2.2-million. Stivers' fundraising total was just shy of the $2-million mark.

Much of Kilroy's fundraising advantage came from individual campaign contributions. In that category, campaign documents show she brought in more than $1.5-million to Stivers' $960,000.

According to the filed documents, the majority of individual campaign contributions came from people who don't live in Ohio.

Topping the list of individual donations to Kilroy's campaign is Emily's List, a Political Action Committee based in Washington, D.C., committed to helping women who are pro-choice Democrats get elected to office.

That group donated a total of $69,811 to Kilroy's campaign through the end of September.

Kilroy also received $9,250 from the Council for a Livable World, a D.C. group that seeks to decrease the number of nuclear weapons and increase national security.

Locally, Kilroy listed $2,300 in donations from Michael C. Council, a Columbus antiques dealer.

She also received several donations from Mo Dioun, president of The Stonehenge Co., including $750 and $1,219 in in-kind donations for a fundraiser. Sheila Dioun, a Stonehenge employee, donated $500, and Mina Dioun, a Stonehenge consultant, donated $2,000.

While individual contributions for Stivers largely came from Ohio, the bulk of his contributions came from out-of-state political action committees and corporations and organizations such as the National Rifle Association, Aflac and Met Life.

Local developer Don Casto III donated $4,600 to Stivers' campaign, as did Ann Casto. Limited Brands head Les Wexner, and his wife, Abigail, each gave $4,600 to the campaign.

Though Kilroy far outpaced Stivers in individual contributions, Stivers compensated by raising more than $1-million in committee contributions, an area in which Kilroy raised less than $600,000.

Much of Stivers' donations came from banks, insurance companies, drug companies and other big businesses.

The American Bankers Association donated a total of $9,000, and local banks also added to Stivers' fundraising campaign, with Fifth Third donating $2,500, Huntington donating $6,000 and National City donating $9,500.

Stivers received $10,000 from Nationwide, $5,500 from Aflac, $5,000 from Liberty Mutual, $4,000 from MetLife and $1,000 from Allstate.

He also received $3,000 from GlaxoSmithKline, $5,000 from Cardinal Health, $5,000 from UPS and $10,000 from the Limited Brands.

Kilroy's largest committee contributor was the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which donated more than $110,000.

Other committee contributions to the Kilroy campaign came largely from union groups, including $10,000 from the United Steelworkers, $10,000 from Teamsters, $10,000 from the National Association of Letter Carriers and $10,000 from the Ironworkers union.

Kilroy also received contributions from Planned Parenthood, which gave $5,000, the American Health Care Association, which gave $5,000, and the American Federation of Teachers, which gave $5,000.