The owners of a dilapidated North Side apartment complex now have until Dec. 31 to fix a series of problems that led city inspectors to order residents to move elsewhere.

The owners of a dilapidated North Side apartment complex now have until Dec. 31 to fix a series of problems that led city inspectors to order residents to move elsewhere.

Franklin County Environmental Judge Dan Hawkins signed an order Nov. 20 with terms agreed to by city prosecutors and the owners of Summit Park Apartments on Le Marie Court, south of Morse Road.

The agreement calls for Summit Park Apartments LLC, based in Richfield, Ohio, to fix all the violations at 18 unoccupied buildings and four occupied units. The owners also agreed to resolve housing violations, including bedbug and roach infestations, and electrical and plumbing problems.

In June, city inspectors placed signs at the complex warning residents that the buildings were unsafe to live in. Major problems included deteriorating walkways, bowing support columns and broken stairways.

Members of Friends of Summit Park, including local clergy and representatives of the business community, helped the largely immigrant and refugee population at Summit Park find new homes.

The citizens group was organized after problems relating to the living conditions there came to light.

Joyce Bourgault, a member of Friends of Summit Park and chairwoman of the Northland Alliance, said last week's action in Environmental Court is "all part of their process."

"They can't put anybody in the buildings until they get everything repaired," she said. "At some point, it will get done or they'll foreclose on them.

Meanwhile, Bourgault said, the former Summit Park residents who were forced to move are doing well, for the most part.

"We're getting a good outcome as far as clients are concerned," she said. "They're re-established ... They're moving on."

Andrew Strigle, a managing member of Summit Park Apartments LLC, said most of the 260 units are still vacant.

He said the owners are sinking "a significant amount" of money into the property to comply with city code, but he wouldn't say how much.

"The bottom line is that there are certain things that need to be taken care of," Strigle said. "We're going to make it a place where people want to live."

Scott Messer, acting director of the city's Department of Building and Zoning Services, said the owners have shown a commitment to fixing the 40-year-old complex that they bought for $3 million in 2009.

Assistant City Attorney Jaiza Page said the owners have worked on the buildings since June. The original orders gave them until Dec. 5 to finish, but city officials gave them an additional 26 days "to give them the ability to comply in good faith," Page said.

"If they have the money, they should be able to get this done," she said. "It has been a long battle."

Hawkins set a compliance hearing for Jan. 23.

ThisWeek Staff Writer Kevin Parks contributed to this story.