Thirteen central Ohio agencies battling homelessness got a cut of $11 million in the latest round of funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Thirteen central Ohio agencies battling homelessness got a cut of $11 million in the latest round of funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Individual grants ranged from $35,000 to $1.4 million.

The Community Housing Network Inc. received the most -- $5.5 million -- for 16 separate programs.

The housing network serves as a developer, owner and property manager of more than 1,600 apartments in 147 locations in Franklin County, including seven suburban communities. CHN also provides rent subsidies to another 400 individuals renting from private landlords.

A $1.4-million grant will be used for sponsor-based rental-assistance funds, used for scattered-site supportive housing, for which the housing network holds the primary lease.

A $1.3-million grant will be used for tenant-based rental-assistance funds, used for scattered-site supportive housing, for private-rent subsidies.

"Community Housing Network is grateful for the renewed funding from HUD," Susan Weaver, chief executive officer of the housing network said in a prepared statement.

"It enables us to continue our mission of helping to reduce homelessness by providing permanent housing to some of Franklin County's most vulnerable citizens," Weaver said.

"When we are able to provide stable housing along with links to needed supportive services, we are giving people a foundation from which they can begin to rebuild their lives."

Columbus Area Integrated Health Services also was a major recipient of HUD dollars, receiving a total of $1.5 million for a rental-assistance program for residents in the emergency shelter system.

The agency, located on the Near East Side, was one of 13 agencies to get grant funds for homeless programs.

Anthony Penn, CEO of the health services agency, said the money will allow the nonprofit organization to expand its residential housing program, a service it has provided for 15 years.

"We're estimating that on an annual basis those dollars will allow us to serve 160 to 170 individuals per year," Penn said.

Penn's agency was awarded a bonus grant through HUD's Continuum of Care program, a competitive-grant initiative. The bonus grants were given to agencies that could best leverage Medicaid funding.

The agency provides a wide gamut of services for the homeless, including behavioral health, primary medical care, pharmaceutical assistance, mental health and substance abuse, Penn said.

He said the agency will place its clients in private rental housing throughout central Ohio.

Sara Loken, spokeswoman for the Community Shelter Board, said Franklin County agencies received about $1.5 million more in funding than they did a year ago.

"I would say we are very excited that we can add more housing for people who are most vulnerable in our community," Loken said.

"And it comes at a great time because we've seen such an increase in homelessness here in the past few years."