The next in an ongoing series of workshops in which residents are being asked to help with a completely new approach to how people get from Point A to Point B in Columbus will take place in the Northland area.

The next in an ongoing series of workshops in which residents are being asked to help with a completely new approach to how people get from Point A to Point B in Columbus will take place in the Northland area.

David Roseman, who reports on transportation and bike-related matters to the Northland Community Council, said the next Connect Columbus "charrette" will take place July 13-16 at the Franklin County Board of Elections, 1700 Morse Road.

Roseman spoke at the NCC's June 2 meeting, the same day the dates for the local workshop were posted on the website of Connect Columbus, formerly known as the city's thoroughfare plan.

The purpose of the new approach, according to the site, is "to improve safety, reduce congestion, assist children and the elderly, and promote economic development, fitness and environmental responsibility."

"The Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan will define the future of transportation in Columbus by providing the rules for alternative means of travel," the site states.

Work on Connect Columbus began in October and a final report is scheduled to be issued in April 2016.

The goal, Roseman told NCC representatives, is to develop a complete transportation plan, one that goes beyond vehicle-focused travel to include transit, pedestrians, bicyclists and more, for the period stretching from 2016 to 2040.

Workshops were held in April at Columbus Downtown High School and earlier this month at the North Broadway United Methodist Church in Clintonville.

The Connect Columbus website defines a charrette as "a design or planning workshop" where a project team and local residents collaborating on a vision -- in this case, building a long-range multimodal transportation plan.